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Lorton in Fairfax County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Irma Clifton

 
 
Irma Clifton Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), February 2, 2020
1. Irma Clifton Marker
Inscription.  In deepest appreciation of the determined and unrelenting Irma Clifton, an extraordinary friend of the Workhouse Arts Center and guardian of the powerful 91-year history of the Lorton Correctional Complex. A history that first changed a nation and then the world.

Irma was born, raised, and lived the majority of her adult life in Lorton, Virginia. She worked for nearly 26 years on this very site at what was once Washington, DC's prison, and later she served as historian and museum docent for the region and Fairfax County.

Irma fought tirelessly to preserve and protect the historical and architectural integrity of the site when it closed in 2001. She pursued her vision for an adaptive reuse of the prison's land and many structures, successfully lobbying legislators, donors, and the Fairfax County Architectural Review Board, and she was instrumental in acquiring a National Historic Register designation for the Laurel Hill property on which the prison was located.

Irma played an integral role in guiding the transformation of the site from abandoned prison to vibrant arts center, even single-handedly creating the
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Workhouse Prison Museum using her own collection. She was a founding member of the Lorton Arts Foundation, served as a key member of the Workhouse Museum and History Committee, and was a long time president of the Lorton Heritage Society.

Irma's warm heart and passionate dedication to the history and culture of the site, to Fairfax County, and to the preservation of the Laurel Hill property, were vital to the creation of the Workhouse Arts Center.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ArchitectureArts, Letters, MusicEducationLaw EnforcementWomen.
 
Location. 38° 41.863′ N, 77° 15.326′ W. Marker is in Lorton, Virginia, in Fairfax County. Marker can be reached from Workhouse Way, 0.1 miles north of Ox Road (Virginia Route 123), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 9601 Ox Road, Lorton VA 22079, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Prisoners at the Workhouse (a few steps from this marker); Development of a Progressive-Era Model Penal System (within shouting distance of this marker); Occoquan Workhouse (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Occoquan Workhouse (about 400 feet away, measured in a
Irma Clifton Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), February 2, 2020
2. Irma Clifton Marker
direct line); Lorton Nike Missile Site (approx. 0.6 miles away); Historic Occoquan (approx. 0.9 miles away); Occoquan River Bridges (approx. 0.9 miles away); Town of Occoquan (approx. 0.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lorton.
 
Dedication plaque inside the building image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), February 2, 2020
3. Dedication plaque inside the building
Additional plaque on the building image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), February 2, 2020
4. Additional plaque on the building
This property
has been placed on the
National Register
of Historic Places

by the United States
Department of the Interior
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 2, 2020. It was originally submitted on February 2, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 302 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on February 2, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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Apr. 15, 2024