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Cobán in Municipality of Cobán, Alta Verapaz, Guatemala
 

Manuel Tot

 
 
Manuel Tot Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, January 22, 2020
1. Manuel Tot Marker
Inscription.  

Coban a su hijo
Manuel Tot
Procer y Martir de la Independencia de Centroamerica
15 de septiembre de 1973

Roldolfo Galeotti Torres, Escultor

Centenario Alta Verapaz
4 de mayo de 1877 – 4 de mayo de 1977
Abrir año 2077
Cortesia: Waldemar Hidalgo Ponce


English translation:
Cobán, to her son,
Manuel Tot
Revolutionary and Martyr of Central American Independence
September 15, 1973

Roldolfo Galeotti Torres, Sculptor

100th Anniversary of Alta Verapaz
May 4, 1877 - May 4, 1977
Open this capsule in 2077
Courtesy: Waldemar Hidalgo Ponce

 
Erected 1973.
 
Location. 15° 28.214′ N, 90° 22.414′ W. Marker is in Cobán, Alta Verapaz, in Municipality of Cobán. Memorial is on 1a Calle just west of 1a Avenida, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Cobán, Alta Verapaz 16001, Guatemala. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 3 other markers are within 18 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Oscar Majus K.
Manuel Tot Statue and Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, January 22, 2020
2. Manuel Tot Statue and Marker
(about 150 meters away, measured in a direct line); Coronel Antonio José Irisarri (approx. 3.3 kilometers away); Reconstruction of the Tactic Parish Church (approx. 17 kilometers away).
 
Regarding Manuel Tot. Manuel Tot was an indigenous revolutionary leader in Guatemala during the late 18th century. He was born in Cobán, Alta Verapaz on May 3, 1779. His full name was Manuel Jesús de la Cruz Tot. He died on July 11, 1815. His family was originally from Chinimlajom Village. From a young age he was an acolyte of the Cathedral of Santo Domingo de Guzmán and later served the Spanish missionaries of that church. Thanks to his work, he traveled frequently to the Captaincy General of Guatemala. Normally, he carried messages from regional authorities. It is also believed that Manuel Tot arrived in the capital of Guatemala with the purpose of becoming a priest. But he did not like this and instead became a merchant, later he began to be a law student. During his life he was associated with the pioneers of independence Francisco Barrundia, Fray Tomás Ruiz, Fray Juan de la Concepción and the law student, Modesto Hernández. Then, he became a leader of the Q’eqchi’ in the so-called Conjuration of Bethlehem independence movement during 1813. The movement sought to end the dominance of the General
Manuel Tot Statue and Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, January 22, 2020
3. Manuel Tot Statue and Marker
Captaincy of Guatemala and the oppression directed from the Spaniards to the natives. When he was betrayed before the authorities by Joaquín Yudice, he had to flee to the border with Mexico. In San Marcos he became seriously ill and was arrested. On the orders of the Captain General of the Republic, José Bustamante y Guerra, he was transferred to the dungeons of the capital city. His last wish was to be buried with chains on, representing his struggle for the freedom of the country and how the indigenous people were still chained to the Spanish powers. Translated and adapted from aprende.guatemala.com
 
Categories. Native AmericansPatriots & PatriotismWars, Non-US
 
A side view of the Manuel Tot statue image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, January 22, 2020
4. A side view of the Manuel Tot statue
The nearby Cathedral of Santo Domingo de Guzmán image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, January 22, 2020
5. The nearby Cathedral of Santo Domingo de Guzmán
 

More. Search the internet for Manuel Tot.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 14, 2020. This page originally submitted on February 14, 2020, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 50 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on February 14, 2020, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.
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