Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Hyattsville in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Constitution / The 19th Amendment

 
 
The Constitution side of the marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 28, 2020
1. The Constitution side of the marker
Inscription.  
The Constitution

The colonists had been bristling under British rule for ten years when the First Continental Congress convened in the Fall of 1774. On April 19, 1775, the Revolution began, and by the end of 1777, the Congress had written the Articles of Confederation, laws by which the government would function.

In May 1786 — three years after the end of the Revolutionary War — the Annapolis Convention and the Congress called a meeting, believing that the nation needed something more than the Articles of Confederation if it was going to survive and thrive. They requested that state delegates meet the following May in Philadelphia for a Constitutional Convention.

On September 17, 1787, after having spent the summer debating and discussing the issues, 39 of the 55 delegates to the Constitutional Convention — eight of whom had signed the Declaration of Independence — signed the proposed Constitution and forwarded it to the states for ratification.

The Constitution begins with these words:

We the people of the United States,
The 19th Amendment side of the marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 28, 2020
2. The 19th Amendment side of the marker
in order to form a more perfect Union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

Under the Constitution, there would now be three separate branches of government — the Executive, the Judicial, and the Legislative — a system of checks and balance, and a method to amend this living, breathing document in the future.

This new government, under the newly ratified Constitution, took effect on April 30, 1789, George Washington's Inauguration Day.

The original Constitution is on permanent display at the National Archives Building in Washington, D.C.

The 19th Amendment

The 19th Amendment reads as follows:

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

1851: Susan B. Anthony (1820 - 1906) and Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815 - 1902), instrumental in advancing the rights of women to vote, met.

1869: Together they created The National
The Constitution / The 19th Amendment Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 28, 2020
3. The Constitution / The 19th Amendment Marker
The marker is the fourth from the left.
Woman Suffrage Association,
which sought to achieve reform on a number of women's issues.

1872: Susan B. Anthony cast her vote in the Presidential Election, an act for which she was arrested, convicted, and fined.

1918: Jeannette Rankin, of Montana, a suffragette and the first woman to be elected to Congress, helped draft the Suffrage Amendment.

1920: As a result of the determined efforts of mostly women for more than seven decades, the constitutional amendment that they sought became the law of the land on August 18, 1920, the 100th anniversary of the year of Susan B. Anthony's birth.

The original amendment is in the National Archives of the United States.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Civil RightsGovernment & PoliticsWomen. In addition, it is included in the Elizabeth Cady Stanton, the Susan B. Anthony, and the Women's Suffrage 🗳️ series lists.
 
Location. 38° 58.187′ N, 76° 57.145′ W. Marker is in Hyattsville, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on Toledo Road just west of America Boulevard, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6525 Belcrest Road, Hyattsville MD 20782, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
. The Treaty at Fort McIntosh / President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's "Day of Infamy" Address (here, next to this marker); A Nation of Immigrants / The Original 13 States (here, next to this marker); To Serve and Defend / Brown V. Board of Education of Topeka (here, next to this marker); The Bill of Rights / The Statue of Liberty (here, next to this marker); The Declaration of Independence / President John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address (a few steps from this marker); The Louisiana Purchase / Edison's Light Bulb Patent (a few steps from this marker); The Lewis & Clark Expedition / The 15th Amendment (a few steps from this marker); The Gettysburg Address / The Emancipation Proclamation (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hyattsville.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 29, 2020. It was originally submitted on February 28, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 72 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 28, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
Paid Advertisement
Mar. 3, 2021