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Near Florissant in Teller County, Colorado — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

You are Standing Where the Ute Indians Once Lived

 
 
You are Standing Where the Ute Indians Once Lived Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, July 8, 2020
1. You are Standing Where the Ute Indians Once Lived Marker
Inscription.  Pikes Peak backcountry was a hunter's paradise, and the native Ute people were constantly challenged by the Plains Indians for possession. Fierce warriors, the Utes endured and are the only tribe based in their Colorado homeland. Kit Carson witnessed a battle between the Comanches and the Utes in 1852 in the meadow in front of you. All along the north side of Florissant Canyon, you can still see traces of the Ute War Trail.

Most of Teller County's major roads were once Ute Indian trails. If you look carefully, you can still see Ute Prayer Trees and Medicine Trees on the roadsides. Highway 24 began as one of the major Ute Indian trails, becoming a wagon road during the 1860s gold rush, then a rail bed for the Colorado Midland Railroad in 1887.

Captions
Top left: Ute Indians called Ute Pass "the doorway into the Red Earth Mountains.” Ute Scouts led De Anza's Spanish army into the Florissant Valley in 1779, where they encamped. They then led the Spanish down Ute pass in pursuit of their enemies, the Comanche. Denver Public Library
Middle left: This photo of Chief Colorow's
You are Standing Where the Ute Indians Once Lived Marker Detail image. Click for full size.
Denver Public Library
2. You are Standing Where the Ute Indians Once Lived Marker Detail
Ute Indians called Ute Pass "the doorway into the Red Earth Mountains.” Ute Scouts led De Anza's Spanish army into the Florissant Valley in 1779, where they encamped. They then led the Spanish down Ute pass in pursuit of their enemies, the Comanche.
buffalo robe shows a total of sixteen rectangles painted on it. Each of these rectangles symbolizes a battle waged at a fort such as Fortification Hill. Denver Public Library
Bottom left: Judge Castello's Ute Trading Post was a favorite visiting place for the Ute Chief Colorow (Co-LORE-oh) and his band. He relished Mrs. Castello's freshly baked biscuits, naming her "Little Biscuit.” He returned her hospitality by showing her how to send smoke signals from the top of Fortification Hill in case of an emergency. Colorado Historical Society
Center: Trusted friend of the Ute, Judge James Castello established a Ute Trading Post here in 1870. Colorado's gold and silver mines soon drew prospectors along the Ute Pass Trail (now Highway 24) to this region. In 1873, Castello established a post office, naming it Florissant for his home town in Missouri. Kimmett Collection
Right: Ute Indians, a nomadic people, occupied most of Colorado from A.D. 500 until 1880. They remained in one area several months each year, hunting wild game and gathering seasonal plants. The Pikes Peak area was home to the Tabeguache band, "The People of Sun Mountain.” In this photo, their chief, Ouray, was one of the most famous Ute chiefs. Denver Public Library
 
Topics. This historical
You are Standing Where the Ute Indians Once Lived Marker image. Click for full size.
Denver Public Library
3. You are Standing Where the Ute Indians Once Lived Marker
This photo of Chief Colorow's buffalo robe shows a total of sixteen rectangles painted on it. Each of these rectangles symbolizes a battle waged at a fort such as Fortification Hill.
marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceNative AmericansRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 38° 56.886′ N, 105° 16.962′ W. Marker is near Florissant, Colorado, in Teller County. Marker is on U.S. 24 0.1 miles west of County Road 45, on the right when traveling west. Marker is located in a pullout with ample parking. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Florissant CO 80816, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Welcome to Florissant, the Northern Gateway to The Gold Belt Tour National Scenic Byway (here, next to this marker); Living Artifacts, Landmarks and Trails of the Ute People (here, next to this marker); Life Zones (approx. 2.4 miles away); Valley Through Time (approx. 2.4 miles away); Making of a Monument (approx. 2.4 miles away); Ancient Forest Diversity (approx. 2.4 miles away); Ancient Clones (approx. 2.4 miles away); Just One Piece at a Time (approx. 2.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Florissant.
 
You are Standing Where the Ute Indians Once Lived Marker Detail image. Click for full size.
Colorado Historical Society
4. You are Standing Where the Ute Indians Once Lived Marker Detail
Judge Castello's Ute Trading Post was a favorite visiting place for the Ute Chief Colorow (Co-LORE-oh) and his band. He relished Mrs. Castello's freshly baked biscuits, naming her "Little Biscuit.” He returned her hospitality by showing her how to send smoke signals from the top of Fortification Hill in case of an emergency.
You are Standing Where the Ute Indians Once Lived Marker Detail image. Click for full size.
Kimmett Collection
5. You are Standing Where the Ute Indians Once Lived Marker Detail
Trusted friend of the Ute, Judge James Castello established a Ute Trading Post here in 1870. Colorado's gold and silver mines soon drew prospectors along the Ute Pass Trail (now Highway 24) to this region. In 1873, Castello established a post office, naming it Florissant for his home town in Missouri.
You are Standing Where the Ute Indians Once Lived Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, July 8, 2020
6. You are Standing Where the Ute Indians Once Lived Marker
Marker is on the left.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 20, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 20, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 61 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 20, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 6, 2021