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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Copper Harbor in Keweenaw County, Michigan — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Estivant Pines

Michigan’s Largest Virgin White Pine Forest

 
 
The Estivant Pines Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 2, 2017
1. The Estivant Pines Marker
Inscription.  When white settlers arrived in Michigan, vast stands of old growth white pine covered the land. Much of the state's initial prosperity relied on processing these trees into useful lumber.

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to walk among such magnificent trees? Thanks to the Michigan Nature Association (MNA), you can! The Estivant Pines Nature Sanctuary is located south of Copper Harbor. (Take Manganese Road to Clark Mine Road and follow the signs.) Two loop trails of about a mile each let you experience the pines much as they were hundreds of years ago. The trails are moderate-to-easy hiking, appropriate for all ages.

This tract of pines was owned by the Estivant family from France, who purchased the Clark Mine and adjacent land. The harsh terrain and climate saved the pines from logging several times. In the early 1970s, however, winter logging was in progress when local activists attracted media attention, raising a cry to save this remnant stand of Michigan's state tree. The MNA persisted and finally negotiated a purchase of the property that saved the pines for all to enjoy. Sanctuary maintenance depends entirely
Marker detail: Sentinels from Centuries Past image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: Sentinels from Centuries Past
These magnificent trees stand 130 to 150 feet high and are 200 to nearly 500 years old.
on donations and volunteer labor.

Explore the History Behind the Beauty
 
Erected by Western Upper Peninsula Heritage Trail and Michigan Nature Association.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: EnvironmentHorticulture & ForestryIndustry & CommerceParks & Recreational Areas.
 
Location. 47° 28.057′ N, 87° 53.3′ W. Marker is in Copper Harbor, Michigan, in Keweenaw County. Marker is on Manganese Road just south of Gratiot Street (U.S. 41), on the right when traveling south. Marker is located at the southeast corner of the Town Hall building, facing Manganese Road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 220 Gratiot Street, Copper Harbor MI 49918, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fort Wilkins State Park and Historic Complex (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Copper Harbor (about 300 feet away); Isle Royale National Park (about 300 feet away); Tracing the Story (approx. half a mile away); "A Rallying Point for Copper Adventurers" (approx. one mile away); The Copper Harbor Lighthouse (approx. 1.1 miles away); Shipwreck (approx. 1.1 miles away); "The Astor will never leave Copper Harbor." (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Copper Harbor.
 
Also see . . .
Marker detail: Sentinels from Centuries Past image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: Sentinels from Centuries Past
This photo by Charles Eshbach, printed in the Milwaukee Journal, March 6, 1971, brought regional attention to the logging and prompted then-owner Universal Oil Products to stop it.

1. Estivant Pines (Wikipedia). The area was originally part of a 2,400-acre tract of land owned by Edward Estivant of Paris, who sold it to Calumet and Hecla Mining Company in 1947. Universal Oil acquired the area in 1968, and soon logged 300 acres of nearby forest. A fund-raising campaign by the Michigan Nature Association lead in 1973 to the purchase of 200 acres from Universal Oil. Three subsequent acquisitions, between 1989 and 2005, have expanded the sanctuary to 510 acres. The area protects one of the last old-growth white pine (Pinus strobus) stands in Michigan. (Submitted on July 30, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Estivant Pines: A Living Museum. Ancient white pine trees like the Estivant Pines once covered a good portion of Michigan. In the late 19th century, lumberjacks cut these trees to supply wood for houses, barns, and carriages needed by a fast-growing nation. Only a few stands of virgin white escaped the lumberjack’s gluttony. Those stands, like Estivant Pines, were spared through random chance and, more recently, the passion of local citizens who wanted to preserve these trees for what they represent. (Submitted on July 30, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
The Estivant Pines Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 2, 2017
4. The Estivant Pines Marker
(Copper Harbor Trailhead in left background)
The Estivant Pines Marker (<i>far left</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, August 2, 2017
5. The Estivant Pines Marker (far left)
(marker located at southeast corner of Town Hall building)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 30, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 28, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 69 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 30, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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Mar. 2, 2021