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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Accokeek in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Pumpkin Ash Trail

Environmental Preservation

 
 
Pumpkin Ash Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, August 14, 2020
1. Pumpkin Ash Trail Marker
Inscription.  
The Pumpkin Ash Trail takes you on a journey through time. In it, you see different stages of a forest growing from cleared land.

When you walk the Pumpkin Ash Trail, you will enter four different habitats. Each is important. Different plants and animals rely on each of them.

You begin in the Forest habitat. Once this land was cleared and farmed, but forest has grown on it again in the last 50 years.

Next you will see the Lowland Forest/Riparian Forest habitat. This habitat has forested areas along the river.

Next you see the Wetland. The Wetland has some areas with nearly constant water, and other areas that are dry sometimes and wet at another times. The water affects what grows in each place.

Finally, you will enter the Grassland. You will notice smaller trees there. That's because it was cleared land until the 1990s, when it was allowed to grow up naturally again.

Ecological Succession
As time progresses, the plants and animals in a particular habitat will change. Some may become more prevalent, while others become less so. Scientists call this process,
Pumpkin Ash Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, August 14, 2020
2. Pumpkin Ash Trail Marker
by which one species displaces another, ecological succession.

Walking through the Pumpkin Ash Trail, you will see the ecological succession in reverse. The first habitat, forest, is a formerly cleared agricultural area where trees have grown for more than 50 years. There you will see trees like live oak and hickory common to old forests. In the grassland area, cleared for agriculture until the 1990s, you will see smaller trees. These sweetgum, tulip poplars, and cedar trees are typical of newer forests.
 
Erected by Accokeek Foundation.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AgricultureEnvironmentParks & Recreational Areas.
 
Location. 38° 41.702′ N, 77° 3.907′ W. Marker is in Accokeek, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker can be reached from Bryan Point Road 0.4 miles north of Cactus Hill Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3400 Bryan Point Rd, Accokeek MD 20607, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Welcome to the Visitor Center (within shouting distance of this marker); Land Shaping People (within shouting distance of this marker); Ecosystem Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); People Shaping the Land (within
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shouting distance of this marker); Cherished Homeland (within shouting distance of this marker); John Smith Explores the Chesapeake (within shouting distance of this marker); Join the Adventure (within shouting distance of this marker); The Hon. Frances Payne Bolton (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Accokeek.
 
Additional keywords. natural reclamation
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 14, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 14, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 43 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 14, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
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Oct. 1, 2020