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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

San Saba in San Saba County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

James Louis & Eleanor Austin Baker

 
 
James Louis and Eleanor Austin Baker Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, August 7, 2020
1. James Louis and Eleanor Austin Baker Marker
Inscription.  

James “Jim” Louis Baker (1829-1903) and Eleanor “Ellen” Prather Austin Baker (1839-1909) married in Travis County on June 15, 1859. Jim’s family moved to Texas from Tennessee during the time of the Republic, and Ellen’s family moved to Travis County from Missouri. Jim’s father, James H. Baker, registered the “Baker B” cattle brand in 1836 in Travis County. The family acquired both cattle and wealth. In 1856, Jim and his brother George moved 6000 head of cattle from Travis County to the newly formed San Saba County. Within 5 years, the herd had multiplied significantly. While traveling from Austin to the Baker home in San Saba, Jim, Ellen, their daughter Olga, and Ellen’s father were attacked by members of the Comanche tribe in Lampasas County in 1861. Jim was wounded by multiple arrows. He recovered but was unable to assume active duty during the Civil War.

After the war ended, Jim and George operated as the “Baker Brothers” with branded cattle ranging from the head of the San Saba River to Onion Creek in Travis County, a distance of 150 miles. Soon after, the brothers decided to
James Louis & Eleanor Austin Baker Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, September 4, 2020
2. James Louis & Eleanor Austin Baker Marker
This view includes the cemetery and marker.
move their cattle from Texas to open lands near Trinidad, Colorado, in an effort to avoid cattle raids. By 1871, Jim and George moved at least three herds to Trinidad using the Goodnight-Loving Trail. The brothers registered their own brand, the “Lazy F” (1873) and by 1878, were ready to move some of the herd to the Quitaque Peaks regions of Northwest Texas, establishing the Quitaque Ranch. In January 1880, Jim and George negotiated the sale of their 140,000-acre Quitaque Ranch, 20,000 cattle and the Lazy F brand to Charles Goodnight for Cornelia and John Adair. The Bakers were able to return to their beloved San Saba and comfortably resume ranching on a limited scale. Both Jim and Ellen died at their home in Baker Valley.
Marker is property of the State of Texas
 
Erected 2008 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 18403.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AnimalsCemeteries & Burial SitesNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 31° 12.189′ N, 98° 43.235′ W. Marker is in San Saba, Texas, in San Saba County. Marker can be reached from State Highway 16 0.1 miles from East Lewis Street. The marker is located in San Saba Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: San Saba TX 76877, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least
James Louis and Eleanor Austin Baker Gravestone next to Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, August 7, 2020
3. James Louis and Eleanor Austin Baker Gravestone next to Marker
8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. San Saba Cemetery (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Sion Record Bostick (about 600 feet away); Estep-Burleson Building (approx. 0.6 miles away); San Saba County Courthouse (approx. 0.6 miles away); The Texas Rangers and the San Saba Mob (approx. 0.6 miles away); San Saba County Jail (approx. 0.6 miles away); Mill Pond House (approx. 0.7 miles away); Alma Ward Hamrick (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Saba.
 
Entrance to San Saba Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, August 7, 2020
4. Entrance to San Saba Cemetery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 18, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 31, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 54 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on August 31, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.   2. submitted on October 17, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.   3, 4. submitted on August 31, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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