Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Cleveland in Cuyahoga County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Three Generations of Bridges

1888-1943

 
 
Three Generations of Bridges Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jason Voigt, September 14, 2018
1. Three Generations of Bridges Marker
Inscription.  

Central Viaduct

The location where Interstate 90 spans the Cuyahoga River Valley is currently crossed by its third generation of bridge. While each generation introduced improvements in technology and capacity, the designs drew inspiration from the past crossings at this location and other Cuyahoga River bridges. In 1888, the Central Viaduct was opened as the original high level crossing of the river. There were two distinct sections of the bridge. The first was 2,839 feet long, traveling about 100 feet above the river, and ran from West 14th Street to Carnegie Avenue. The steel trestle originally had a steel center swing span over the river that could open to allow taller ships to pass. In 1895 a safety switch failed while the swing span was open and a street car plunged into the river, taking 17 people to their deaths. That span was later replaced in 1912 by an overhead truss. The bridge was closed in 1941 because of its overall deterioration, and in 1943 was razed for scrap metal used in the World War II effort; however, the streetcar tracks remain visible on the Central Viaduct abutment. The second section of the
The Cleveland Skyline Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jason Voigt, September 14, 2018
2. The Cleveland Skyline Marker
Marker (not pictured) is located in this small park, to the right of the Cleveland script sign.
bridge, known as the Walworth Run, was 1,088 feet long and connected Abbey Avenue and Lorain Avenue until 1986, when it was replaced by a new bridge.

Innerbelt Bridge

With the advent of the interstate highway system, the Innerbelt Bridge was constructed and placed into service in 1959. The bridge was 5,078 feet long and 116 feet wide - the widest bridge in Ohio at its time of construction. The bridge, which carried both eastbound and westbound traffic, was a classic steel deck truss with a cast-in-place concrete deck and steel parapets. According to Case Western Reserve University's Encyclopedia of Cleveland History, the Innerbelt Freeway removed 50,000 vehicles per day from downtown streets, and served as a vital connection between downtown's major interstates: I-71, I-77, and I-90. This bridge was demolished in 2014 to make room for the third generation bridge.

George V. Voinovich Bridge

The twin-bridge replacement of the old Innerbelt Bridge was constructed between 2011 and 2016. At the time of its construction project in Ohio history. The total replacement pumped more than half-a-billion dollars into the city of Cleveland. Each steel bridge was designed with a concrete deck and parapets. The arch design is reminiscent of other bridges throughout the valley and unique and triangular "delta girders" sit-atop each pier.
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
To illuminate the steel girders, energy efficient LED lights were included to provide an infinite variety of nighttime color. The bridge was dedicated to statesman George V. Voinovich in 2013.

George V. Voinovich

George V. Voinovich is one of the State of Ohio's most distinguished public servants. Born and raised in Cleveland, Voinovich has held numerous public posts including U.S. Senator, Ohio Governor, and Cleveland Mayor. For more than 40 years, Voinovich dedicated his life and service to bettering the lives of the citizens of Ohio and his hometown of Cleveland. In 2011, Ohio Governor John R. Kasich signed a bill naming the new bridge after Voinovich. "For a man who rebuilt Cleveland and went on to help rebuild Ohio, it is a wonderful tribute," Kasich said. Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson called the honor "appropriate and well deserved." Since his retirement in 2011, Voinovich spends his time with his wife, Janet and their eight grandchildren. He is a Senior Fellow at Cleveland State University, an Ohio Visiting Professor of Leadership and Public Affairs at Ohio University and remains committed to and involved with the Voinovich School of Leadership and Public Affairs at Ohio University.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Bridges & ViaductsRoads & VehiclesWaterways & Vessels.
 
Location.
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
41° 29.086′ N, 81° 41.553′ W. Marker is in Cleveland, Ohio, in Cuyahoga County. Marker is on Abbey Avenue west of West 14th Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1502 Abbey Ave, Cleveland OH 44113, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Industrial River Valley (within shouting distance of this marker); The Cleveland Skyline (within shouting distance of this marker); Camp Cleveland (approx. ¼ mile away); Market Square (approx. 0.6 miles away); John W. Heisman Birth Site (approx. ¾ mile away); Saint Ignatius High School (approx. 0.8 miles away); Ohio City / Monroe Street Cemetery (approx. 0.8 miles away); Welcome to Monroe Street Cemetery (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cleveland.
 
Also see . . .
1. George Voinovich on Wikipedia. Voinovich (1936-2016) is widely credited for "Cleveland's Comeback" during the 1980s and 1990s. As the marker says, he had held several government positions for 46 years, beginning in 1963. (Submitted on September 22, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois.) 

2. George V. Voinovich Bridges on Wikipedia. (Submitted on September 22, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 22, 2020. It was originally submitted on September 22, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois. This page has been viewed 55 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 22, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. a wide view of the marker • Can you help?
Paid Advertisement
Jan. 16, 2021