Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Alameda in Alameda County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

An Era of Dramatic Change

 
 
An Era of Dramatic Change Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, September 29, 2020
1. An Era of Dramatic Change Marker
Inscription.  Historically Alameda was a peninsula, rich in natural resources. Native peoples gathered food and materials from bay salt marshes, abundant oak forests, and nearby shorelines. From the early 1800's the western tip of the peninsula now known as Alameda Point became farmland before becoming an industrial center and ferry/rail transit hub.

Alameda was not always an island. Construction of a tidal canal was proposed to improve tidal flow through the Estuary from San Leandro Bay, and to deepen the channel for large vessel traffic. Alameda became an island in 1902 when the project was completed.

In 1936, the City of Alameda sold the western portion of the island and adjacent submerged lands to construct the Naval Air Station (NAS). It was the largest naval air station in the nation at that time.

In 1997, the government decommissioned the NAS. Since then, the land and facilities have become a mixture of civilian uses including new parklands and trails such as this section of the San Francisco Bay Trail.

(picture caption:)

Lee's painting Alameda Shore provides a glimpse of this pastoral landscape

An Era of Dramatic Change Marker - wide view image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, September 29, 2020
2. An Era of Dramatic Change Marker - wide view
Click or scan to see
this page online
in transition. For a brief two months in autumn of 1869, Alameda Point was the final terminus of the historic transcontinental railroad. The buildings to the right were workshops of Alfred A. Cohen's San Francisco and Alameda Railroad. Here, rail passengers from across the country boarded the ferry Alameda for the final leg of their journey to San Francisco.


 
Erected by East Bay Regional Parks District.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Air & SpaceEnvironmentWaterways & Vessels. A significant historical year for this entry is 1902.
 
Location. 37° 46.303′ N, 122° 17.894′ W. Marker is in Alameda, California, in Alameda County. Marker can be reached from Alameda Point Shoreline Trail. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Alameda CA 94501, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A Working Waterfront (a few steps from this marker); The Jimmy Doolittle Pier – Alameda Naval Air Station (approx. 0.2 miles away); Pan Am China Clipper (approx. 1.1 miles away); Alameda Terminus of the 1st Transcontinental Railroad (approx. 1.1 miles away); U.S. Maritime Officers Memorial (approx. 1.2 miles away); First Transcontinental Railroad (approx. 1.2 miles away); Skippy Peanut Butter

<i>Alameda Shore</i> image. Click for full size.
Joseph Lee (courtesy of the Fine Art Museum of San Francisco, via Wikipedia), circa 1868
3. Alameda Shore
This image is the same as on the marker - "Alameda Shore (Joseph Lee, c. 1868) depicts a ferry meeting the first run of the railroad on August 25, 1864."
(approx. 1.3 miles away); 930 Pacific Avenue (approx. 1.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Alameda.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 8, 2020. It was originally submitted on September 30, 2020, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 61 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 30, 2020, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
Share This Page.  
Share on Tumblr
Paid Advertisement
Mar. 9, 2021