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Near Hempstead in Waller County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Camp Groce Cemetery

 
 
Camp Groce Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, August 2, 2020
1. Camp Groce Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  

During the Civil War, a Confederate training camp was built on Colonel Leonard W. Groce's Liendo Plantation. Camp Groce was north of the railroad and east of Clear Creek. Later Camp Groce was converted to a prisoners of war camp for Union officers, soldiers, sailors and teamsters, who were captured at the battles of Galveston, Sabine Pass (Texas), Calcasiue Pass (Louisiana) and Marks Mill (Arkansas).

Disease and logistics required moving the prisoners from camp to camp in 1863 through 1865. Harsh conditions and bad weather caused many deaths and Camp Groce became the joint burial location for both Union and Confederate soldiers.

The Camp Groce Cemetery is located nearby. One memorable internment was the Masonic Funeral for Surgeon Ariel Cummings of the 42nd Mass., an over worked, noncombatant, aiding the sick and wounded. Cummings died of deprivation and disease. Free Masons, both Union and Confederate, gave him a ceremony of honor on September 10, 1863.
 
Erected 2017 by Waller County Historical Society.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial Sites
Camp Groce Cemetery Area image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, August 2, 2020
2. Camp Groce Cemetery Area
The view of the cemetery is completely overgrown. This view is right behind the marker.
War, US Civil.
 
Location. 30° 5.309′ N, 96° 2.513′ W. Marker is near Hempstead, Texas, in Waller County. Marker is on Farm to Market Road 359 half a mile north of Business U.S. 290, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Hempstead TX 77445, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Liendo Plantation (approx. 0.9 miles away); Liendo (approx. one mile away); Plantation Home of Edwin Waller (approx. one mile away); Clear Creek Confederate War Camps (approx. 1.1 miles away); Groce Family Plantations (approx. 1.1 miles away); Gen. George and Libbie Custer Campsite (approx. 1˝ miles away); Captain Alfred H. Wyly (approx. 1.6 miles away); First United Methodist Church of Hempstead (approx. 2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hempstead.
 
Regarding Camp Groce Cemetery. Source Wikipedia - Additional details

In June 1863, Camp Groce was re-opened as a prison camp for Union prisoners captured in the Battles of Galveston (January 1, 1863) and Sabine Pass I (January 21, 1863). The Union prisoners of war taken at the Battle of Sabine Pass II (September 8, 1863) were also sent to Camp Groce. 427 Union prisoners were held at Camp Groce in 1863 and 21 died. Most of the dead
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were buried northeast of camp where most of them still rest today.

Camp Groce was re-opened in May 1864 for 148 Union prisoners captured at the battle of Calcasieu Pass, Louisiana. The group of prisoners included the crew of the USS Granite City and USS Wave, Tinclad #45, and 37 soldiers. About 40 soldiers from the 1st Texas US Cavalry were sent to Camp Groce in June 1864, and 506 more Union prisoners were transferred to Camp Groce from Camp Ford in August 1864. Yellow fever and other diseases affected the prisoners. They were moved to Camp Gillespie near Bellville in late September 1864 and then to Camp Felder, 6.5 miles north-northwest of Chappell Hill, Texas. 221 prisoners died or were missing from Camps Groce, Gillespie, and Felder in 1864. 444 were paroled in December 1864.

1863: 427 POWs, 21 died, 2 escaped
1864: 683 POWs, 147 died, 28 missing, 18 escaped, 13 deserted to the enemy, 14 status unknown, and 1 political prisoner held by CS authorities until released in May 1865.

Totals: 1,110 POWs held, 168 died, 28 missing, 20 escaped, 13 deserted to the enemy, 14 status unknown

At least 277 Confederate soldiers died or went missing in and around Hempstead, Texas during the Civil War.

Most of the US and CS soldiers who died in and around Hempstead, Texas during the Civil War are still buried in the area.
 
Also see . . .
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1. Camp Groce. TSHA Texas State Historical Association (Submitted on October 19, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

2. Liendo Plantation. TSHA Texas State Historical Association (Submitted on October 19, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 20, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 19, 2020. This page has been viewed 65 times since then and 7 times this year. Last updated on October 19, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 19, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 8, 2021