Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Matagorda in Matagorda County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1862

 
 
The Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1862 Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, October 11, 2020
1. The Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1862 Marker
Inscription.  

One of the most important port cities of Texas’ early history, Matagorda served as an exit point for goods such as cotton shipped down the Colorado River. During the Civil War, it was also an important point for Confederate blockade runners to move goods and bypass Union ships. It was also at this time that Yellow Fever made its way into the city. Much like the tropical storms, cases of Yellow Fever swept through Texas coastal communities periodically, doing particular damage to cities like Galveston as part of a larger-scale epidemic that haunted the coast for decades. The worst epidemic period for Matagorda was in the fall of 1862.

During the Civil War, the continual movement of contraband through Matagorda’s port likely introduced the Aedes Aegypti Mosquito species to the populace. This species, still a danger today, thrived in the wetlands of Matagorda County. It carried the deadly Yellow Fever, causing extreme symptoms such as Jaundice and Kidney failure. From September 27 to November 27, 1862, Yellow Fever ravaged the city. Research suggests that as much a one third of the city’s population died from the disease. Further
The Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1862 Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, October 11, 2020
2. The Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1862 Marker
The Yellow Fever marker is the left marker of the two markers.
deaths occurred among slave populations throughout the county, but no names of these victims have been recovered. The disease also caused the death of many soldiers throughout the county and neighboring areas. By the time it had subsided, many had been buried in Matagorda Cemetery. Matagorda continues to be an important location for bio-archaeological research into viral outbreaks.
Marker is property of the State of Texas
 
Erected 2015 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 18121.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansScience & MedicineSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil.
 
Location. 28° 42.072′ N, 95° 57.338′ W. Marker is in Matagorda, Texas, in Matagorda County. Marker is on Matagorda Cemetery Road 0.1 miles north of South Gulf Road, on the left when traveling south. The marker is in the center section of the cemetery and east of the main entrance. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Matagorda TX 77457, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Matagorda Cemetery (here, next to this marker); First Burials in Matagorda Cemetery (a few steps from this marker); Graves of Unknown Matagorda Settlers (within shouting distance of this marker); a different
The Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1862 Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, October 11, 2020
3. The Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1862 Marker
The marker is near the flagpole through the main entrance.
marker also named Matagorda Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Hannah Carr (within shouting distance of this marker); The Matagorda Incident (within shouting distance of this marker); Albert Clinton Horton (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Richard Royster Royall (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Matagorda.
 
Also see . . .  The History of Yellow Fever. Wikipedia (Submitted on October 25, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 25, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 25, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 43 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 25, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement
Mar. 6, 2021