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Near Burkittsville in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Cobb's Georgia Legion

South Mountain State Battlefield

 

— Crampton's Gap Trail —

 
Cobb's Georgia Legion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bradley Owen, October 21, 2020
1. Cobb's Georgia Legion Marker
Inscription.  "It was here that so many of the Legion were killed and taken prisoners. When once over the fence there was no escape. Surrender or utter annihilation were the only alternatives."
Southern Confederacy, Atlanta GA, September 30, 1862

Soon after arriving at Crampton's Gap, Cobb's Georgia Legion, commanded by Jefferson M. Lamar, along with the 16th Georgia, commanded by Philip Thomas, were sent down Gapland Road to support the Confederate right. As these regiments were going into position, the Confederate line at the base of the mountain broke under the weight of the Union assault. The Georgians crossed the stone wall bordering the road and formed a battle line in the area in front of you. As they began firing into the advancing Union lines in front of them, Alfred Torbert's New Jersey Brigade was advancing on their left flank and rear. Surrounded on three sides the Legion was finally forced to retreat towards the gap. Of the 248 men who entered the battle, Cobb's Legion lost 190, most of whom were captured.

"Slowly, but determinedly, we pressed the enemy back, and as we neared the crest of the mountain the fighting
Cobb's Georgia Legion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bradley Owen, October 21, 2020
2. Cobb's Georgia Legion Marker
The Georgian's battled in the area in front of the marker.
was desperate."

Sgt. John P Beech, Co. B, 4th New Jersey Infantry

(captions)
Lieutenant Colonel Jefferson M. Lamar, mortally wounded near here during the battle.

Sergeant Benjamin Mell of Cobb's Legion. Mortally wounded during the battle, he would tell his fellow soldiers, "Boys, I know I must die, but don't leave the field."

Though likely not an accurate depiction of the Battle of Crampton's Gap, this wartime engraving most closely depicts the stand of the Cobb's Georgia Legion.
 
Erected by Maryland Park Service.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. 39° 24.318′ N, 77° 38.278′ W. Marker is near Burkittsville, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Arnoldtown Road and Gapland Road, on the left when traveling south. Marker is on the 0.5 mile Crampton's Gap Walking Trail, east (down hill) of the War Correspondence Memorial Arch. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 900 Arnoldtown Rd, Burkittsville MD 21718, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Confusion of Battle (within shouting distance of this marker); Defeat Turns To Route (sic) (within shouting distance of this marker); The Battle of Crampton's Gap (about
Battle of South Mountain<br>Franklin's Corps Storming Crampton's Pass image. Click for full size.
Internet Archive
3. Battle of South Mountain
Franklin's Corps Storming Crampton's Pass
Though likely not an accurate depiction of the Battle of Crampton's Gap, this wartime engraving most closely depicts the stand of the Cobb's Georgia Legion.
This engraving by A. R. Waud appeared in Harper's Weekly Oct. 25, 1862.
300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Gath's Empty Tomb (about 400 feet away); Mausoleum (about 400 feet away); The Battle of South Mountain (about 400 feet away); Journalists Who Gave Their Lives (about 400 feet away); Crampton’s Pass Tablet C.P. 1 (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Burkittsville.
 
Also see . . .  Gathland State Park. Maryland Department of Natural Resources (Submitted on October 26, 2020.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 17, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 25, 2020, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. This page has been viewed 52 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 25, 2020, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia.   3. submitted on November 16, 2020, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 7, 2021