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Winchester in Frederick County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Ricketts’s Attack

“Then it came our turn to shoot”

 

— The Third Battle of Winchester (September 19, 1864) —

 
Ricketts’s Attack Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bradley Owen, October 17, 2020
1. Ricketts’s Attack Marker
Inscription.  
Time: Late Morning

After critical delays getting his troops on the field, Union commander Gen. Philip H. Sheridan was finally able to launch his first attack at 11:40 am. Gen. James B. Ricketts's division of the 6th Corps led the attack here, advancing westward along the course of the Berryville Turnpike (modern-day Route 7) under heavy fire from Confederate artillery. After a shaky start, Rickett's men drove back the Confederate skirmishers and charged across the ground behind you.

On the opposite side of the ravine in front of you, North Carolinians and Virginians from Gen. Stephen D. Ramseur's division put up a tenacious defense from behind rail breastworks constructed on the Dinkle Farm. Eventually, Col. J. Warren Keifer's brigade struck the northern flank of Ramseur's line and it quickly crumbled under the pressure. Ramseur withdrew toward Winchester.

A soldier of the 126th Ohio described the scene, "Then it came our turn to shoot. We poured a volley into their rear, and then with a yell started after them on the double quick and they retreated in great confusion."

Ricketts drove Ramseur
Ricketts’s Attack Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bradley Owen, October 17, 2020
2. Ricketts’s Attack Marker
Close up of map on the marker.
well beyond the ground currently occupied by I-81. Ramseur rode into the midst of the jumbled mass of retreating Southerners and "knocked every man over the head who refused to halt." A counterattack led by Gen. Robert E. Rodes struck Ricketts's right flank just before they were about to capture the Confederate artillery and forced him to withdraw to this area. Ramseur joined in the attack with rallied elements of his division and the pace of combat slowed in this area until late in the afternoon.

(captions)
Third Winchester 11:40 A.M. Attack
You Are Here. Arrow indicates viewing direction.

Ricketts's Divisional Flag. Image courtesy Nicholas P. Picerno Collection.

This sign made possible through funds donated by the Millbrrok High School Cross Country Team
 
Erected 2020 by Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. 39° 11.319′ N, 78° 7.866′ W. Marker is in Winchester, Virginia, in Frederick County. Marker is on Getty Lane 0.2 miles north of Gateway Drive, on the left when traveling north. Marker is across the road from the TownePlace Suites by Marriott Winchester and near the southwestern trailhead
Ricketts’s Attack Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bradley Owen, October 17, 2020
3. Ricketts’s Attack Marker
Marker in the foreground, North Carolina Monument and Third Winchester Battlefield trailhead.
for the Third Battle of Winchester Trail. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 170 Getty Lane, Winchester VA 22603, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. North Carolina At Third Winchester (within shouting distance of this marker); Third Battle Of Winchester (within shouting distance of this marker); The West Woods (within shouting distance of this marker); Third Battle of Winchester (approx. 0.4 miles away); Captain Robert Young Conrad (approx. 0.4 miles away); Counterattack! (approx. half a mile away); Major General Robert Emmett Rodes (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named The Third Battle of Winchester (approx. ¾ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winchester.
 
Also see . . .  The Third Battle of Winchester. The Shenandoah Valley Battlefields National Historic District (Submitted on October 31, 2020.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 6, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 28, 2020, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. This page has been viewed 84 times since then and 6 times this year. Last updated on November 6, 2020, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 28, 2020, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Feb. 26, 2021