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Burkittsville in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The 15th North Carolina

South Mountain State Battlefield

 

— Crampton's Gap Trail —

 
The 15th North Carolina Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bradley Owen, October 21, 2020
1. The 15th North Carolina Marker
Inscription.  “As the enemy pressed on the right the Fifteenth took position behind a rock fence, with instructions to hold it, which they did until the enemy succeeded in forcing the Georgia regiments (which formed the right of the brigade) back and gained the rear and the possession of the road across the gap.”

In front you is Arnoldstown Road. At the time of the battle, the road was separated from Whipp’s Ravine by an almost vertical rise. The road itself was bordered by a stone wall.

The 15th North Carolina of Cobb's Brigade was directed down the Arnoldstown Road to cover the Confederate left. Taking shelter behind the stone wall along the road, they soon realized their position's strength and waited for the battle to come to them. As the mass of Union troops advanced up the mountain, led by the 96th Pennsylvania, the 15th North Carolina engaged them from the shelter of the stone wall. The Union advance was temporarily stalled. However, as the units of the Georgia regiments to the right of the 15th North Carolina gave way, Union troops began to approach the summit of the gap. Now, behind the North Carolinians, these
The 15th North Carolina Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bradley Owen, October 21, 2020
2. The 15th North Carolina Marker
Union troops began firing into their right flank and rear. In danger of being surrounded, the North Carolinians had no choice but to abandon their position and retreat up the mountainside.

The 96th Pennsylvania pursued the Confederates, collecting prisoners, to the summit of the mountain where they were joined by other Union troops. But with darkness coming on, the Federals withdrew back to Arnoldstown Road for the night.

"It was a most exhausting charge. By the time we had ascended half way the cannon had ceased firing on our left, and the enemy seldom responded to our fire with their muskets. We made captures at every step. After passing the crest of the mountain a lieutenant of the Fifteenth North Carolina delivered himself up. I sent during the charge, 42 prisoners to the rear."
Col. Henry L. Cake's Official Report of the Battle of Crampton's Gap

 
Erected by Maryland Park Service.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. 39° 24.283′ N, 77° 38.407′ W. Marker is in Burkittsville, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Arnoldtown Road and Gapland Road, on the left when traveling south. Marker is on the 0.5 mile Crampton's Gap Walking Trail,
The 15th North Carolina Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bradley Owen, October 21, 2020
3. The 15th North Carolina Marker
Marker shown along the walking trail.
east (down hill) from the War Correspondence Memorial Arch. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Burkittsville MD 21718, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. GATH: The Man and His Mountain (within shouting distance of this marker); Brownsville Pass: Semmes’ Gamble (within shouting distance of this marker); Troup Light Artillery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Padgett’s Field: Confederate Last Stand (about 300 feet away); Burial: A Most Disagreeable Task (about 300 feet away); The Stage is Set (about 300 feet away); Bartlett Leads the Way (about 300 feet away); Medal of Honor Recipients (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Burkittsville.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 13, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 26, 2020, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. This page has been viewed 42 times since then and 2 times this year. Last updated on November 13, 2020, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 26, 2020, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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Feb. 27, 2021