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Zittlestown in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

South Mountain Summit

What an Ideal Location for a Break!

 
 
South Mountain Summit Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), October 11, 2020
1. South Mountain Summit Marker
Inscription.  
As early as 1750, Robert Turner bought land here on the top of South Mountain. The date of construction is unknown, but by 1790 a full-fledged inn was in operation at “Turner’s Gap.” Since then, the building has been in almost continuous use as an inn, tavern or private residence.

After the steep climb up South Mountain’s slope, horsemen, stagecoach drivers and passengers, even drover and teamsters, reveled in the luxury of the famous “Mountain House.” During its heyday, the inn boasted 21 rooms, including a bathhouse and a bowling alley. Utilitarian barns, pens, outhouses, a blacksmith shop, and smoke house surrounded it.

(sidebar) Beware of the “Snarly Yow.” Legend has it that the shadow of a black dog used to prowl the heights of South Mountain. One night, a huntsman, famous as a sure shot, encountered the beast. He aimed and fired his rifle. The shot went right through the animal with no effect. He fired again and again, each shot passing through the shadowy beast. Finally overcome with dread, the huntsman fled.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in
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these topic lists: Notable BuildingsRoads & Vehicles. In addition, it is included in the The Historic National Road series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1750.
 
Location. 39° 29.067′ N, 77° 37.161′ W. Marker is in Zittlestown, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is at the intersection of Old National Road (Alternate U.S. 40) and Washington Monument Road, on the right when traveling west on Old National Road. Located at a pull off from the Washington Monument Road, along side the Old National Road. Across the highway from the Old South Mountain Inn. Very close to the Frederick and Washington County line. The Appalachian Trail passes a few feet from the marker. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Myersville MD 21773, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 1 (within shouting distance of this marker); Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 2 (within shouting distance of this marker); Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 3 (within shouting distance of this marker); Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 4 (within shouting distance of this marker); Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 5
South Mountain Summit Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, June 9, 2007
2. South Mountain Summit Marker
This is a previous iteration of the marker. The content is identical although the formatting is slightly different.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 6 (within shouting distance of this marker); 19th Century Backpacker (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle at South Mountain (within shouting distance of this marker); 1862 Antietam Campaign (within shouting distance of this marker); John Collins (within shouting distance of this marker).
 
More about this marker. The marker features two pictures of the roadway along the gap, with the caption, “Spectacular views from the National Road as it descends the eastern slope of South Mountain have attracted travelers from near and far.”
 
Also see . . .  History of the Old South Mountain Inn. (Submitted on July 9, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
South Mountain Summit Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), October 11, 2020
3. South Mountain Summit Marker
Boundry Stone near the Marker? image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, July 21, 2007
4. Boundry Stone near the Marker?
19th century marker, probably slate, of unknown origin. It may have been used to indicate the boundary between Frederick and Washington Counties, as it is placed such that travelers heading east would see the "F", indicating that they were entering Frederick County.
Thanks to Christopher Busta-Peck for the investigative work.
Reverse of the Stone image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
5. Reverse of the Stone
The "W" seen on the reverse should seal the case. This is a county boundary stone.
South Mountain Inn image. Click for full size.
Photographed By George Constable, June 7, 2008
6. South Mountain Inn
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 12, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 9, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 3,019 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 12, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   2. submitted on July 9, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on October 12, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   4. submitted on July 29, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on February 10, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   6. submitted on June 12, 2008, by George . Constable of Hagerstown, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.

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