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Dove Creek in Dolores County, Colorado — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Community and Conflict

 
 
Community and Conflict Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 14, 2020
1. Community and Conflict Marker
Inscription.  

Ancestral Puebloans

Beginning around A.D. 600, Ancestral Puebloans built Colorado's first permanent towns in the canyon country south of here. Hundreds of these settlements sprawled across the desert, with an overall population possibly greater than the region holds today. Two of the larger communities, known to us as Yellow Jacket and Lowry Pueblos, lodged several hundred souls apiece. The residents lived in great houseblocks with scores of rooms, stored their food in stone granaries, built small dams and reservoirs for water storage, and raised corn, beans, and squash in terraced plots. After prospering for hundreds of years, these ancestral peoples left their homes for a variety of reasons, including climatic changes, increased warfare, and social upheavals. By 1300 they had left these extraordinary communities empty and silent.

Beaver Creek Massacre

Anglo-Ute [relations?] in Colorado reached a low point on June 19, 1885, when a group of cowboys ambushed a peaceful Ute camp on Beaver Creek [illegible] miles southeast of here. Racial tensions had never [illegible] after a bloody 1879 conflict at the Ute agency

Community and Conflict Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 14, 2020
2. Community and Conflict Marker
Marker on right
in northeastern Colorado ever since, "The Utes must go" had been a [illegible] white settlers. The cowboys who attacked the Beaver Creek camp took this slogan quite literally, murdering at least six and perhaps as many as ten people, women and children among them. The Utes retaliated by killing a white rancher, and [illegible] followed, only the mediation of Indian [illegible] prevented [illegible]. But there [illegible]. The Utes had [illegible] but the far [illegible] of Colorado.

[Photos and their captions are illegible, except for bottom right caption, which reads]
Unidentified Utes, 1880. The cowboys involved in the Beaver Creek Massacre had vowed to kill any Indian found off the reservation. Yet, the Utes murdered that morning had official permission to hunt in this area in order to supplement their meager government rations.
 
Erected by Colorado Historical Society, CO DOT, Federal Highway Administration, and CO Division of Wildlife.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Anthropology & ArchaeologyDisastersNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 37° 45.896′ N, 108° 54.54′ W. Marker is in Dove Creek, Colorado, in Dolores County. Marker is at the intersection

Community and Conflict Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 14, 2020
3. Community and Conflict Marker
of U.S. 491 and Guyrene Street, on the right when traveling west on U.S. 491. Marker is in a small triangular town park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Dove Creek CO 81324, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Dove Creek Country (here, next to this marker); Gunnison Sage Grouse (here, next to this marker); Dove Creek (here, next to this marker); War Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Why East? / Who Were The Franciscans? (a few steps from this marker).
 
More about this marker. The marker is heavily deteriorated and needs replaced.
 
Also see . . .
1. Beaver Creek Massacre (Colorado Encyclopedia). (Submitted on November 15, 2020, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Beaver Creek Massacre Site. (Submitted on November 15, 2020, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 15, 2020. It was originally submitted on November 15, 2020, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 31 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 15, 2020, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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Mar. 5, 2021