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Huntsville in Madison County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Huntsville's Pioneer Suffragists

 
 
Huntsville's Pioneer Suffragists Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, November 21, 2020
1. Huntsville's Pioneer Suffragists Marker
Inscription.  Ratified in 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution guaranteed women the right to vote. The Twickenham Town Chapter, NSDAR honors the history of Huntsville's pioneer suffragists, who met here at the home of Alberta Chapman Taylor (1853-1912).

A daughter of Alabama Gov. Reuben Chapman, Taylor became active in the women's suffrage debate in the 1890s while living in Colorado. There, she came to know national suffrage leaders, including Susan B. Anthony and Carrie Chapman Catt. Returning to Huntsville in 1894, Taylor helped form the city's Women's Equal Suffrage Association, among the first such groups in the state. The group later joined with others under the banner of the Alabama Woman Suffrage Association. The following year, she arranged for Anthony and Catt to add Huntsville as part of their southern lecture tour. Taylor presided over the state association's convention in 1900. She died in 1912, before women secured the vote.

Joining Taylor in the cause were her sisters Julia Chapman Clanton (1845-1910) and Ellelee Chapman Humes (1865-1920). Humes served as founding vice-president of Huntsville's suffrage
Huntsville's Pioneer Suffragists Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, November 21, 2020
2. Huntsville's Pioneer Suffragists Marker
association and as vice-president of the state association in 1916. A founding member of the Twickenham Town Chapter, NSDAR, Humes died two months before ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment.

Virginia Tunstall Clay-Clopton (1825-1915) was president of Huntsville's Women's Equal Suffrage Association from its founding until her death. She served as president of the state association from 1896-1900. Virginia Clay (1862-1911) and her sister, Susanna W. Clay (1858-1928), were editors of the Huntsville Democrat. Through this publication they encouraged the cause of women's suffrage, writing supportive articles, editorials, and advertising meetings.

In 1901, Clay-Clopton, Alberta Chapman Taylor, Julia Chapman Clanton, Ellelee Chapman Humes, were among more than two dozen Madison County women who petitioned the delegates of the state constitutional convention to extend the vote to propertied women. In 1913, although in her eighties, Virginia Tunstall Clay-Clopton served as president of the Huntsville chapter of the newly formed Alabama Equal Suffrage Association. In 1915, that organization forced the first vote in the Alabama legislature on the topic of women's suffrage.

Although few of Huntsville's pioneer suffragists lived long enough to vote themselves, their efforts on behalf of the cause helped make “votes for women” a constitutional
Huntsville's Pioneer Suffragists Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, November 21, 2020
3. Huntsville's Pioneer Suffragists Marker
The Alberta Chapman Taylor home, where early suffragists met, is in the background.
guarantee. In commemoration of the centennial of ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, the Twickenham Town Chapter, NSDAR honors their commitment.
 
Erected 2020 by Alabama Historical Association and Twickenham Town Chapter, National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Civil RightsWomen. In addition, it is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the Women's Suffrage 🗳️ series lists.
 
Location. 34° 43.77′ N, 86° 34.743′ W. Marker is in Huntsville, Alabama, in Madison County. Marker is on McClung Avenue SE, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 416 McClung Avenue SE, Huntsville AL 35801, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Leroy Pope Mansion 1814 (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Helion Lodge No. 1 (about 500 feet away); Thomas Bibb House (approx. 0.2 miles away); First Presbyterian Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Howard Weeden Home (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Public Inn (approx. 0.2 miles away); Twickenham Historic District (approx. ¼ mile away); Birthplace of General Morgan (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Huntsville.
 
Also see . . .
The Huntsville League for Women's Suffrage image. Click for full size.
By Public domain, circa 1895
4. The Huntsville League for Women's Suffrage
 Remember the Ladies. Article by Donna Castellano, Executive Director of the Historic Huntsville Foundation. From the October 2020 issue of Initiatives magazine, a Huntsville/Madison County Chamber of Commerce publication. (Submitted on November 22, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 22, 2020. It was originally submitted on November 22, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 49 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 22, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.
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Feb. 28, 2021