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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Liberty Center in Henry County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Prairie Des Mascoutins / Damascus

 
 
Prairie Des Mascoutins / Damascus Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, April 12, 2012
1. Prairie Des Mascoutins / Damascus Marker
View of the text on the front side of the historic marker.
Inscription.  
"Prairie Des Mascoutins"
In 1742, a tribe of Kickapoo requested permission from Montreal's Governor to move to a Mascoutin village on both sides of the river here. French "Coureurs de Bois" traders named the wide floodplain "La Prairie des Mascoutins" (The Meadow of the Mascoutin). In 1764, Captain Thomas Morris explored this newly acquired British territory, and met the prophetic dreamer Chief Katapelleecy here. General Anthony Wayne's troops victoriously returned from The Battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794 and burned "Prairie de Masque." The Treaty of Detroit in 1807 created a hunting reservation to the east, allowing settlers to acquire the surrounding lands. Ethnic tensions climaxed in 1812, when an American Captain Logan was mortally wounded near here. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 caused the remaining tribes to move west.

Damascus
After the War of 1812, Samuel Vance, brother of future Governor Joseph Vance, built a log tavern and trading post at Prairie de Masque. Edwin Scribner settled here in 1816, building the area's first sawmill on Dry Creek. By 1823, all of modern Henry County and portions
Prairie Des Mascoutins / Damascus Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, April 12, 2012
2. Prairie Des Mascoutins / Damascus Marker
Close-up view of the text on the back side of the historic marker.
of other counties became Damascus Township of Wood County, with "Damascus" as the county seat. Further growth occurred in 1837 when the state built the Wabash and Erie Canal (later the Miami and Erie). Odessa formed on the opposite side of the river with ferry service between the two towns. Village decline began with the construction of the Toledo and Illinois Railroad in 1854 (later the Toledo, Wabash, and Western Railroad) and ended with the building of the first Damascus Bridge in 1909.
 
Erected 2001 by Ohio Bicentennial Commission, The Longaberger Company, The Liberty Center Historical Society, Inc., and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 1-35.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Native AmericansSettlements & SettlersWar of 1812Wars, US Indian. In addition, it is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection series list.
 
Location. 41° 24.662′ N, 84° 0.46′ W. Marker is near Liberty Center, Ohio, in Henry County. Marker is at the intersection of U.S. 24 and Ohio Route 109, on the left when traveling west on U.S. 24. This historic marker is located along the southeastern edge of the parking lot for a small carry-out located along
Prairie Des Mascoutins / Damascus Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, April 12, 2012
3. Prairie Des Mascoutins / Damascus Marker
View of the historic marker looking west towards a nearby carry-out and the Anthony Wayne Trail (US 24).
US 24, where state route 109 heads east and crosses the Maumee River. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Liberty Center OH 43532, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. World War II Memorial (approx. 2.1 miles away); Oak Tree (approx. 2.3 miles away); Liberty Center (approx. 2.9 miles away); James Durbin (approx. 3.3 miles away); Grelton Veterans Memorial (approx. 4˝ miles away); Miami & Erie Canal And Napoleon's First Cemetery (approx. 5.9 miles away); 221 East Washington (approx. 6.1 miles away); 127 E. Clinton (approx. 6.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Liberty Center.
 
Prairie Des Mascoutins / Damascus Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, April 12, 2012
4. Prairie Des Mascoutins / Damascus Marker
View of the historic marker looking north towards the intersection of US 24 and State Route 109.
Prairie Des Mascoutins / Damascus Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, April 12, 2012
5. Prairie Des Mascoutins / Damascus Marker
View of the historic marker looking south towards to Maumee River and south along state route 109.
Prairie Des Mascoutins / Damascus Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, April 12, 2012
6. Prairie Des Mascoutins / Damascus Marker
View looking southeast of the historic marker in the left foreground and of the nearby state route 109 as it travels east and crosses the Maumee River.
Prairie Des Mascoutins / Damascus Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, May 31, 2018
7. Prairie Des Mascoutins / Damascus Marker
The marker was moved about 200 feet south along 424 and now sits across the road from the intersection with 109. New bridge was built in 2018 and the marker was moved shortly after.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 25, 2020. It was originally submitted on April 15, 2012, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 661 times since then and 13 times this year. Last updated on November 23, 2020, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on April 17, 2012, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   7. submitted on November 23, 2020, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.
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