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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Stanton in Mercer County, North Dakota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Tobacco

 
 
Tobacco Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 28, 2020
1. Tobacco Marker
Inscription.  "Tobacco was cultivated in my tribe only by old men." - Buffalo Bird Woman's Garden

"Our young men did not smoke much; a few did, but most of them used little tobacco, or almost none. They were taught that smoking would injure their lungs and make them shot-winded so that they would be poor runners. But when a man got to be about sixty years of age we though it right for him to smoke as much as he liked. His war days and hunting were over."
"The first harvest was of these blossoms, which we reckoned the best part of the plant for smoking....Just before frost came, the rest of the plants were gathered, the stems and leaves." Buffalo Bird Woman's Garden
 
Erected by Department of the Interior, National Parks Service.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AgricultureNative Americans.
 
Location. 47° 23.665′ N, 103° 14.853′ W. Marker is near Stanton, North Dakota, in Mercer County. Marker can be reached from County Highway 37 near 6th Street Southwest, on the
Tobacco Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 28, 2020
2. Tobacco Marker
right when traveling north. The marker is located at the Knife River Indian Villages Interpretive Center. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 546 County Road 37, Stanton ND 58571, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 15 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Grassy Butte Post Office Museum (here, next to this marker); Badlands Panorama (approx. 12.2 miles away); Longhorns (approx. 13.8 miles away); Slump Formation (approx. 14 miles away); “Cannon Ball” Concretions (approx. 14˝ miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Buffalo Bird Woman's Garden -- Minnesota Historical Society. In Buffalo Bird Woman's Garden, first published in 1917, anthropologist Gilbert L. Wilson transcribed the words of this remarkable woman, whose advice today's gardeners can still follow. (Submitted on December 10, 2020, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 10, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 10, 2020, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 29 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 10, 2020, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.
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Mar. 6, 2021