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Springfield in Greene County, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Springfield National Cemetery

 
 
Springfield National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, April 7, 2019
1. Springfield National Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  

Civil War Springfield
Federal troops occupied Springfield, Missouri, in June 1861. In August, when Confederate forces marched on the city, Union Gen. Nathaniel Lyon led his army out to meet them.

On August 10, 1861, the Confederate army commanded by Gen. Sterling Price defeated Lyon's troops at Wilson's Creek. The courthouse, Methodist church, and many other Springfield buildings were pressed into service as hospitals for the Union wounded.

After the spring 1862 Battle of Pea Ridge in Arkansas, the U.S. Army established a General Hospital in Springfield. The city was already a pivotal Union supply depot. The Confederates attacked Springfield on January 8, 1863, but were defeated. The city saw no more major Civil War engagements.

National Cemetery
Springfield National Cemetery was established in 1867 on a 5-acre tract purchased from the city. Remains of Union dead from Lebanon, Newtonia, Springfield, and Wilson's Creek battlefields were reinterred here. By 1868 it contained 1,514 graves, about half unknown. In 1911, Congress authorized the secretary of war to take ownership
Springfield National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, April 7, 2019
2. Springfield National Cemetery Marker
of the adjacent 2.7-acre Confederate cemetery. The existing superintendents' lodge and rostrum, built in the 1940s, replaced the original ones.

Three Civil War Medal of Honor recipients are buried here. Corp. Harrison Collins, 1st Tennessee Cavalry (U.S.), captured a Confederate flag at Richland Creek, Tennessee, December 24, 1864 (Section 26, Grave 1357B).

Musician Orion P. Howe, a wounded 14-year-old drummer with the 55th Illinois Infantry, stayed on the battlefield until he was able to tell Gen. William T. Sherman that his regiment needed ammunition, Vicksburg, Mississippi, May 19, 1863 (Section 4, Grave 207A).

Capt. Patrick Pentzer, 97th Illinois Infantry, accepted the surrender of a Confederate general and a flag at Fort Blakely, Alabama, April 9, 1865 (Section 24, Grave 1696).

Monuments
There are two Union Civil War monuments here, Dedicated on Memorial Day 1873, a 24-foot-tall pedestal and shaft topped by a marble figure of a Union soldier honors troops killed in the Battle of Springfield. Dr. Thomas Jefferson Bailey, former slave owner and staunch Unionist who died in 1869, had bequeathed funds to erect it. The second honors Gen. Nathaniel Lyon, the U.S. commander at the Battle of Wilson's Creek. Lyon, who was killed in action, was the first Union general to die in the Civil War. Citizens of Springfield
Blue Star Memorial Highway in Springfield National Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, April 7, 2019
3. Blue Star Memorial Highway in Springfield National Cemetery
raised funds for the 14-foot-tall marble column erected in 1888 Lyon is buried in Eastford, Connecticut.

Captions
Cemetery entrance and original Second Empire-style lodge, 1903 National Archives and Records Administration

Civil War Army Medal of Honor Gettysburg, National Military Park.

Postcard view of cemetery with Union Monument (foreground) and Lyon Monument (background), c. 1907 National Cemetery Administration.
 
Erected by US Department of Veterans Affairs, National Cemetery Administration.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil.
 
Location. 37° 10.45′ N, 93° 15.833′ W. Marker is in Springfield, Missouri, in Greene County. Marker is on East Seminole Street, on the right when traveling east. The marker is on the grounds of the Springfield National Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Springfield MO 65804, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A National Cemetery System (here, next to this marker); Revolutionary War Memorial (here, next to this marker); Veterans Memorial (here, next to this marker); Remember Pearl Harbor (a few steps from this marker); Missouri Soldiers Memorial C.S.A
Springfield National Cemetery 1999 NRHP Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, April 7, 2019
4. Springfield National Cemetery 1999 NRHP Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); American Veterans Memorial (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Vietnam Veterans Memorial (about 500 feet away); Pearl Harbor Memorial (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Springfield.
 
An additional marker in the Springfield National Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, April 7, 2019
5. An additional marker in the Springfield National Cemetery
Graves in Springfield National Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, April 7, 2019
6. Graves in Springfield National Cemetery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 16, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 10, 2020, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. This page has been viewed 40 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on December 10, 2020, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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