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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sandy Spring in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Welcome to the Woodlawn Stone Barn Visitor Center

 
 
Welcome to the Woodlawn Stone Barn Visitor Center Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), December 17, 2020
1. Welcome to the Woodlawn Stone Barn Visitor Center Marker
Inscription.  
More than 150 years ago, Woodlawn plantation was the envy of Montgomery County farmers and the pride of its owners, the Palmer family. The estate boasted one of the County's grandest manor homes, productive fields, and several outbuildings.

In 1832, Dr. William Palmer built the farm's centerpiece—a finely crafted stone barn that stands strong to this day. Surrounded by a vibrant community of progressive Quaker farmers at Sandy Spring, Woodlawn and the Palmers prospered.

The farm still saw its share of struggles. Enslaved laborers toiled in the fields, within reach of the Underground Railroad and a chance for freedom. The Palmers also faced a choice: enslave men, women, and children for profit, or free them as many Quakers had done.

Today's tranquil park belies the years of change Woodlawn has seen. Get to know the farm and its neighborhood through the voices of people who once called Woodlawn home.

[Sidebar:]
1. Begin your visit here in the Carriage House to meet a few of Woodlawn's residents and get a picture of the County's past.

2. Visit the
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Stone Barn's Exhibits where echoes of the past tell the story of a bustling farm, its community, and those who made a bold bid for freedom on the Underground Railroad.

3. Explore the grounds, including the Manor House, which dates to the first quarter of the 19th century, and was once a boarding school.

4. Outbuildings include a Meathouse/Springhouse, Tenant House, and circa-1854 Log Cabin that may have once housed Woodlawn's enslaved workers.

5. Hike the Underground Railroad Experience Trail. The path evokes the perilous journey fugitives took through Montgomery County.
 
Erected by Montgomery Parks.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Abolition & Underground RRAfrican AmericansAgricultureChurches & ReligionSettlements & Settlers. In addition, it is included in the Quakerism series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1832.
 
Location. 39° 7.69′ N, 77° 1.554′ W. Marker is in Sandy Spring, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker can be reached from Norwood Road (Maryland Route 182) 0.1 miles north of Ednor Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 16501 Norwood Rd, Sandy Spring MD 20860, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers
Welcome to the Woodlawn Stone Barn Visitor Center Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), December 17, 2020
2. Welcome to the Woodlawn Stone Barn Visitor Center Marker
are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Woodlawn (within shouting distance of this marker); Quakers Practicing their Faith in Montgomery County (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Rachel Carson Greenway (about 300 feet away); African Americans and Quakers in Sandy Spring (about 300 feet away); Children Growing Up in Montgomery County (approx. ¼ mile away); The Holland Red Door Store (approx. ¼ mile away); The Sandy Spring (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Sandy Spring Ash Tree (approx. 1.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sandy Spring.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 17, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 17, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 173 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 17, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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Apr. 25, 2024