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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Winchester in Frederick County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Third Battle of Winchester

Camp Averell

 
 
The Third Battle of Winchester Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
1. The Third Battle of Winchester Marker
Inscription.  In the months after the Third Battle of Winchester, this area became home to Camp Averell, named after Union cavalry gen. William Woods Averell. Elements of six cavalry and "mounted infantry" regiments from New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia all camped here from September 1864 to March 1865. Shallow pits from winter huts can still be found, remnants of the sprawling camp.

This "camp" was hardly settled, however. The units stationed here conducted active operations in the Shenandoah Valley, raiding, skirmishing, and then returning to camp to rest and resupply. Company H of the 2nd West Virginia Cavalry, stationed here in late 1864, marched 400 miles in November and December alone.
 
Erected by Civil War Preservation Trust.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. Marker has been reported permanently removed. It was located near 39° 11.677′ N, 78° 6.958′ W. Marker was near Winchester, Virginia, in Frederick County. Marker could be reached from Redbud Road, on
Help Preserve 3rd Winchester image. Click for more information.
2. Help Preserve 3rd Winchester
Details of CWPT efforts to save this battlefield.
Click for more information.
the right when traveling east. Located at the Camp Averell Wayside, along the Union Trail, inside the CWPT Third Winchester Battlefield site. The closest access site is a trail head on the west side of the Frederick County School complex parking lot. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Winchester VA 22603, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. The Middle Field (approx. 0.4 miles away); “Shrapnel Rained On Us” (approx. 0.4 miles away); Jost Hite and Winchester (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named Third Battle of Winchester (approx. half a mile away); Ten Thousand Devils (approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker also named The Third Battle of Winchester (approx. 0.6 miles away); The Third Battle of Winchester (approx. 0.7 miles away); Alabama (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winchester.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left side, the marker displays a portrait of Union General William Woods Averell. In the center is a wartime photograph of "A typical Civil War cavalry camp. There is no known, existing image of Camp Averell." On the lower right is a topographical map displaying the location of Camp Averell.
 
Also see . . .
1. Civil War Preservation Trust page on Third Winchester. (Submitted on October 27, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
2. CWPT Walking Tour of The Third Battle of Winchester. This marker is one along the walking trail around a portion of the Third Winchester Battlefield, preserved by the Civil War Preservation Trust. (Submitted on October 27, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Camp Averell Topographical Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
3. Camp Averell Topographical Map
Camp Averell Wayside image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
4. Camp Averell Wayside
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 28, 2021. It was originally submitted on October 27, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,787 times since then and 5 times this year. Last updated on January 2, 2021, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. Photos:   1. submitted on October 27, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on March 13, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4. submitted on October 27, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Feb. 25, 2021