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Brownsville in Cameron County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Divided Loyalties: Hispanics in the Civil War

Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge Palmito Battlefield

 
 
Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge Palmito Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, May 8, 2020
1. Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge Palmito Battlefield Marker
Inscription.  If you were an American of Hispanic descent during the Civil War, which side would you choose?

Your answer might depend on status, wealth, livelihood, or location. Altogether, more than 20,000 Hispanic soldiers fought in the Civil War. Many were Mexican-Americans living in the southwest. Others were of Spanish, Cuban, or South American descent.

In the Battle of Palmito Ranch, Hispanic soldiers fought with Union and Confederate regiments. Both the 2nd Texas Ü.S. Cavalry and the CSA's Texas Cavalry battalions had Hispanic troops.

Although many Mexican-American soldiers were fighting in their own backyard, other soldiers were far from home. The 34th Indiana Volunteer Infantry and the 62nd U.S. Colored Infantry of Missouri played major roles at Palmito.

(captions)
Santos Benavides, was the captain of the 33rd Texas Cavalry, also called Benavides' Regiment, until he was promoted to colonel in November 1863. Benavides was the highest-ranking Tejano soldier in the Confederate military. In May 1865, Benavides regiment was in the last battle of the Civil War-Battle of Palmito Ranch.

David Glasgow Farragut,

Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge Palmito Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, May 8, 2020
2. Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge Palmito Battlefield Marker
was the son of Revolutionary War hero Jorge Farragut of Spain. Farragut was the first senior officer of the U.S. Navy during the Civil War. He was the first rear admiral, vice admiral, and full admiral of the Navy. He is best remembered for his order at the Battle of Mobile Bay: "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!"

White and Black soldiers in 1860's.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Hispanic AmericansWar, US Civil.
 
Location. 25° 57.571′ N, 97° 18.204′ W. Marker is in Brownsville, Texas, in Cameron County. Marker can be reached from Palmito Hill Road 0.1 miles south of Boca Chica Boulevard (State Highway 4), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Brownsville TX 78521, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The High Price of Cotton (here, next to this marker); The Battle of Palmito Ranch (here, next to this marker); Last Battle of the Civil War (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Palmito Ranch (approx. 0.2 miles away); Exploring The Boundaries (approx. 0.2 miles away); Palmito Ranch Battlefield: Last Clash of the Blue and the Gray (approx. 0.2 miles away); Site of Camp Belknap

Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge Palmito Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, May 8, 2020
3. Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge Palmito Battlefield Marker
(approx. 4.6 miles away); Port of Brownsville (approx. 6.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Brownsville.
 
Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge Palmito Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, May 8, 2020
4. Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge Palmito Battlefield Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 15, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 13, 2021, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. This page has been viewed 33 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 13, 2021, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 6, 2021