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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Miamisburg in Montgomery County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Historical Era of Miamisburg Mound

Miamisburg Mound State Memorial

 
 
The Historical Era of Miamisburg Mound Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, January 6, 2021
1. The Historical Era of Miamisburg Mound Marker
Inscription.  The first settler to own the land on which the Miamisburg Mound is located was Jacob Lawres who purchased 175 acres of raw timberland in 1806. His land deed was signed by President Thomas Jefferson. The first pioneer settlers of southwestern Ohio discovered and marveled at the mound and speculated about the identity of its builders. Early artists and photographers came to capture the mound on canvas and film. During the 1869 excavation, interest in the crowds was so large that a special police force was detailed to prevent encroachment.

The site became a park in 1920 when Charles F. Kettering of Dayton purchased it from the heirs of John Treon. Mr. Kettering gave the land with its mound to the Ohio Historical Society in 1929. During the New Deal of the 1930's, many Ohio Historical Society Sites were made more inviting to visitors through the work of the Federal Recovery Administration and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) who built improvements that made visiting them easier and more attractive. The CCC gathered unemployed men put them to work. One type of structure CCC workers often built at OHS sites were picnic shelters including

The Historical Era of Miamisburg Mound Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, January 6, 2021
2. The Historical Era of Miamisburg Mound Marker
picnic tables and benches. Many of these structures were substantial stone or wood frame buildings and have come to be of historical interest themselves for their association with the New Deal effort to put Americans back to work during the Great Depression (See 1935 plaque in large picnic shelter). Mr. and Mrs. E,J, Miller donated an additional two and one-half acres in 1936. The park is managed on behalf of the Ohio Historical Society by the City of Miamisburg.

Miamisburg Mound continues to be one of the last visible remnants of the Adena Culture in the Miami Valley. The years have created changes at the mound. Gone is the path which once wound around to the top. Today, one hundred and sixteen stone steps have been added that lead to the top of the mound. Protective fencing has been placed too.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Anthropology & ArchaeologyNative AmericansParks & Recreational Areas.
 
Location. 39° 37.65′ N, 84° 16.8′ W. Marker is in Miamisburg, Ohio, in Montgomery County. Marker is on Mound Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Miamisburg OH 45342, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Has This Site Ever Been Explored? (here, next to this marker); Current Restoration Efforts (here, next to this marker);

The Historical Era of Miamisburg Mound Marker image. Click for full size.
By TeamOHE, January 6, 2021
3. The Historical Era of Miamisburg Mound Marker
Who built the Mound and why did they build it? (here, next to this marker); Miamisburg Mound State Memorial (here, next to this marker); Miamisburg Mound (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Miamisburg Mound (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Site of Mound Laboratory (1946- 2003) (approx. 0.3 miles away); Mound Laboratory (1946- 2010) (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Miamisburg.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 3, 2021. It was originally submitted on February 1, 2021, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. This page has been viewed 40 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 1, 2021, by TeamOHE of Wauseon, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Feb. 25, 2021