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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Bakersfield in Kern County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Kern County Begins

 
 
Kern County Begins Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, February 4, 2021
1. Kern County Begins Marker
Inscription.  

When European explorers first came to what is now Kern County, it was inhabited predominantly by indigenous peoples known as the Chumash, Kawaiisu, Kitanemuk, Serrano, Tubatulabal and Yokuts.

The Kern County area was first claimed by the Spanish in 1769. Three years later, Pedro Fages became the first European to enter the area. The end of European rule in California occurred when Mexico won their independence from Spain in 1821. Mexico gave California to the United States under the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848.

Kern County was formed from parts of Los Angeles and Tulare Counties in 1866. At first, only miners were drawn to Kern County’s mountains and desert. The many swamps, lakes and tule reeds in the San Joaquin Valley caused people to consider the area inhospitable and impassable.

This changed when settlers began draining swamplands and controlling water distribution through canals. Within 10 years, the economic influence of the valley floor surpassed the mining areas, and the county seat was moved from Havilah to Bakersfield in 1874.
 
Erected by
Kern County Begins Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, February 4, 2021
2. Kern County Begins Marker
Kern County Museum.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AgricultureEnvironmentIndustry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 35° 23.597′ N, 119° 1.231′ W. Marker is in Bakersfield, California, in Kern County. Marker can be reached from Chester Avenue just north of 36th Street, on the left when traveling north. The marker is located in Pioneer Village at the Kern County Museum, down the straight path from the entrance, in front of some restrooms. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3801 Chester Avenue, Bakersfield CA 93301, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. General Store (a few steps from this marker); Undertaker's Office (a few steps from this marker); Hotel Fellows (within shouting distance of this marker); Assay Office (within shouting distance of this marker); Standard School (within shouting distance of this marker); Court House and Jail (within shouting distance of this marker); Kern Valley Bank (within shouting distance of this marker); Lόpez-Hill House (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bakersfield.
 
Edward M. Kern image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose
3. Edward M. Kern
Kern County is named for Edward M. Kern, an artist hired by the United States government to accompany an 1845 expedition led by John C. Fremont.
Colonel Thomas Baker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose
4. Colonel Thomas Baker
Bakersfield is named for Colonel Thomas Baker, who was known for his friendliness towards travelers, letting them graze their horses in his pasture known as “Baker’s Field.”
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 19, 2021. It was originally submitted on February 13, 2021, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. This page has been viewed 48 times since then. Last updated on February 18, 2021, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on February 13, 2021, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 2, 2021