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Bryan in Brazos County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Confederate Veterans in Bryan City Cemetery

 
 
Confederate Veterans in Bryan City Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, April 3, 2021
1. Confederate Veterans in Bryan City Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  

The Civil War and its aftermath greatly affected Brazos County. War halted progress of the Houston & Texas Central Railway and made Millican a boomtown. After the war, the railroad created a new town, Bryan City, and brought a need for men and women to build up the new settlement.

Bryan City Cemetery is the final resting place of at least 161 Confederate veterans who settled here to help the city develop. Many of their stories intersect in life and in death. Milton Walker Sims, Sr., Aide-de-Camp on Gen. Paul O. Hebert's staff, was later given command of his own cavalry regiment. Col. Sims is the highest-ranking Confederate officer in the cemetery. Guy Morrison Bryan, Jr. opened the First National Bank of Bryan (1886) and created the Brazos River Bridge Co. (1896) to erect the first steel bridge over the waterway. Milton Parker, who fought at Shiloh and Vicksburg, was active in commerce, banking and real estate, acquiring vast land holdings in the Brazos River bottoms. William Edward Saunders founded the city's commercial club and was the last Confederate veteran buried here. Briscoe Gerard Baldwin, Jr., Chief of Ordnance
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for the Army of Northern Virginia, came to Texas to operate a stage line from San Antonio to El Paso, then was superintendent of Brazos County Schools. Henry Bates Stoddard was President of Texas Cattle Raisers Association (1887) and, as Brig. Gen. in the Texas Volunteer Guard, presided over ceremonies dedicating the new capitol building in Austin (1888). Many Confederate veterans were early faculty and staff of the Agricultural & Mechanical College of Texas (later Texas A&M), including William Adam Banks, Dr. David P. Smythe, William Bringhurst and Bernard Sbisa. These men with a common bond in war banded together for the common good and progress of their city and state.

175 Years of Texas Independence • 1836-2011
 
Erected 2011 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 16933.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesIndustry & CommerceWar, US Civil.
 
Location. 30° 40.998′ N, 96° 22.071′ W. Marker is in Bryan, Texas, in Brazos County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of North Texas Avenue and North Washington Avenue, on the right when traveling north. The marker is located in the Bryan City Cemetery just past the entrance. Touch for map
Confederate Veterans in Bryan City Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, April 3, 2021
2. Confederate Veterans in Bryan City Cemetery Marker
. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1111 North Texas Avenue, Bryan TX 77803, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Charles Eric Jenkins (within shouting distance of this marker); Isom Palmer (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Bryan City Cemetery (about 400 feet away); Black Education in Bryan (approx. 0.3 miles away); Allen Chapel A.M.E. Church (approx. 0.4 miles away); Site of Odd Fellows University and Orphans Home (approx. 0.6 miles away); St. Joseph School (approx. 0.7 miles away); St. Joseph Catholic Church (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bryan.
 
The view of the Confederate Veterans in Bryan City Cemetery Marker from the road image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, April 3, 2021
3. The view of the Confederate Veterans in Bryan City Cemetery Marker from the road
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 6, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 6, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 259 times since then and 55 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 6, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Jul. 23, 2024