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Nacogdoches in Nacogdoches County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Governor Martin de Alarcon in East Texas

 
 
Governor Martin de Alarcon in East Texas Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, April 10, 2021
1. Governor Martin de Alarcon in East Texas Marker
Inscription.  Don Martin de Alarcon rose to the position of Governor of Texas in 1716. As governor he aimed to establish a secure presidio along the San Antonio River for the movement of goods to frontier missions and settlements. Despite the imperative nature of his plan, Alarcon remained at Presidio San Juan Bautista del Rio Grande through 1717. In April, he delayed his expedition further to investigate the illicit activities of French trader (and smuggler) Louis Juchereau de St. Denis. Missionaries protested Alarcon's investigation. St. Denis provided the missions with support and goods that Alarcon had yet to supply himself. Alarcon eventually released St. Denis, but his crusade against French trade did not end.

Alarcon finally set off on his expedition in April 1718, and established the civil settlement villa San Fernando de Bexar, often called San Antonio, and the mission San Antonio de Valero. After a brief interlude to the gulf, Alarcon toured the province of Tejas where he visited each of the six missions. He met with local leadership, Caddo and clergy, and distributed supplies. Despite Alarcon's gestures, missionaries continued to view
Governor Martin de Alarcon in East Texas Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, April 10, 2021
2. Governor Martin de Alarcon in East Texas Marker
Marker is the second from the left of the five markers visible in this photo.
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Alarcon badly because he also confiscated French trade goods. When he planned to attack the French fort in Natchitoches, East Texas missionaries intervened on behalf of the French. Later, Frenchman Lt. Philippe Blondel attacked the Mission San Miguel in 1719, which caused settlers to flee to San Antonio de Bexar. Despite being unpopular in his day, scholars argue that Alarcon's establishment of the villa San Antonio and the fallout from the subsequent attack in 1719 provided the humble beginnings for the thriving future city along the river.
 
Erected 2015 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 18267.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraHispanic Americans. A significant historical month for this entry is April 1718.
 
Location. 31° 36.104′ N, 94° 39.382′ W. Marker is in Nacogdoches, Texas, in Nacogdoches County. Marker is on South Pecan Street 0.1 miles south of East Pilar Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Nacogdoches TX 75965, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Captain Domingo Ramon (here, next to this marker); Governor Marquis de San Miguel de Aguayo (here, next to this marker); Angelina (here, next to this marker); Franciscan Friars in East Texas (here, next to this marker);
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Chas. Hoya Land Office (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Site of First Home in Texas Owned by General Sam Houston (about 400 feet away); Gladys Hampton Building (about 400 feet away); Sam Houston's First Home in Texas (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Nacogdoches.
 
Also see . . .  Alarcón, Martín de (unknown–unknown) - The Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) (Submitted on April 12, 2021, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 12, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 12, 2021, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. This page has been viewed 28 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 12, 2021, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.

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May. 13, 2021