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Nacogdoches in Nacogdoches County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Governor Marquis de San Miguel de Aguayo

 
 
Governor Marquis de San Miguel de Aguayo Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, April 10, 2021
1. Governor Marquis de San Miguel de Aguayo Marker
Inscription.  In 1719, Jose de Azlor y Virto de Vera, the Marquis de San Miguel de Aguayo (d. 1734), replaced Martin de Alarcon as Governor of Texas. His appointment coincided with war between Spain and France which prompted Aguayo to send an expedition to East Texas to secure its border with Louisiana. He renamed the province Nuevas Filipinas (New Philippines) to emphasize Spanish jurisdiction over the territory. He requested Father Felix Isidro Espinosa and Father Antonio Margil de Jesus to join the expedition in order to reestablish the six previously abandoned Tejas missions.

Then in 1721, Aguayo marched from his headquarters in Monclova with 584 soldiers, missionaries and caretakers to East Texas. The entrada was the largest ever to occur in Spanish Texas. During the expedition, Aguayo allied with native groups, including the Rancheria Grande and Caddo. On July 25, 1721, Aguayo met with the leader of the Hainai and his interpreter Angelina, who pledged loyalty to him and Spain. When Aguayo neared the missionary fields at the Neches River, Louis Juchereau de St. Denis, new commandant of the French fort Saint Jean Baptiste, requested a meeting
Governor Marquis de San Miguel de Aguayo Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, April 10, 2021
2. Governor Marquis de San Miguel de Aguayo Marker
Marker is the middle of the five markers visible in this photo.
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with Aguayo. St. Denis informed the governor that war between the two nations had ceased. With this new development, Aguayo pressed St. Denis to abandon his invasion of Texas. St. Denis withdrew and Aguayo began to reestablish the missions. In addition to Presidio Dolores, he added Presidio Nuestra Senora del Pilar de los Adaes, a fortification only fourteen miles from the French outpost of Natchitoches. Aguayo's performance as governor reaffirmed Spanish supremacy in Tejas, and prevented any further French claims to the region.
 
Erected 2015 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 18266.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraHispanic Americans. A significant historical date for this entry is July 25, 1721.
 
Location. 31° 36.104′ N, 94° 39.382′ W. Marker is in Nacogdoches, Texas, in Nacogdoches County. Marker is on South Pecan Street 0.1 miles south of East Pilar Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Nacogdoches TX 75965, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Angelina (here, next to this marker); Governor Martin de Alarcon in East Texas (here, next to this marker); Franciscan Friars in East Texas (here, next to this marker); Captain Domingo Ramon (here, next to this marker); Chas. Hoya Land Office
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(about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Site of First Home in Texas Owned by General Sam Houston (about 400 feet away); Gladys Hampton Building (about 400 feet away); Sam Houston's First Home in Texas (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Nacogdoches.
 
Also see . . .  Aguayo, Marqués de San Miguel de (unknown–1734) - The Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) (Submitted on April 12, 2021, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 12, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 12, 2021, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. This page has been viewed 32 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 12, 2021, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.

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May. 14, 2021