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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lower Chanceford Township in York County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Story Told by Our Totem Pole

 
 
A Story Told by Our Totem Pole Marker image. Click for full size.
By Carl Gordon Moore Jr., April 9, 2021
1. A Story Told by Our Totem Pole Marker
Inscription.  
The carving at the bottom of the pole is a representation of the mythical American Indian creature Dsonoquo with a baby, a traditional totem pole motif.

The second level stands for a beaver, an animal once common along the Susquehanna River.

A fish jumping from the water below a series of steps was carved on the third level at the request of museum personnel, to commemorate the origin of the site now known as Indian Steps.

The fourth level of the pole shows a turtle, a symbolic creature of early Native Americans who previously lived in the area.

A raven and an Indian figurehead are expressed on the fifth and sixth levels of the pole.

The top level is shaped like a thunderbird, a mythical creature that stands for power, strength and battle.

Indian Steps
Totem Pole History

Totem poles were originally created by the American Indians of the Pacific Northwest, and were intended to tell stories or describe family lineages. The first totem pole at Indian Steps was a 28 ft. tall cedar monument made by a Blackfoot Indian, Red Fox Skihushu, aided
A Story Told by Our Totem Pole Marker image. Click for full size.
By Carl Gordon Moore Jr., April 9, 2021
2. A Story Told by Our Totem Pole Marker
Indian Steps Museum
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by his cousin Te-Da-De-Wen-Ren in the early 1920's and was replaced in 1957 by an 18 ft. tall pole, carved by Gordon Hanna, a Sioux Indian from Maryland.

The present 36 ft. tall totem pole was crafted in 1989 by seven members of Yorkcarvers, a local woodcarving group, who followed traditional patterns of northwest American Indian carvings.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Anthropology & ArchaeologyNative Americans. A significant historical year for this entry is 1957.
 
Location. 39° 51.799′ N, 76° 22.528′ W. Marker is in Lower Chanceford Township, Pennsylvania, in York County. Marker can be reached from Indian Steps Road 0.7 miles from Furnace Road (Pennsylvania Route 425), on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 205 Indian Steps Road, Airville PA 17302, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Indian Steps (here, next to this marker); Indigenous Peoples of the Susquehanna Valley (here, next to this marker); Indian Steps Cabin (a few steps from this marker); The River's Ways (approx. 0.7 miles away); Susquehanna River Water Trail (approx. 0.7 miles away); York Furnace Bridge (approx. 0.9 miles away); Susquehanna Canal (approx. 0.9 miles away); Susquehanna and Tidewater Canal (approx. 0.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lower Chanceford Township.
 
More about this marker. The marker is mounted on the building to left of main entrance.
 
A Story Told by Our Totem Pole Marker image. Click for full size.
By Carl Gordon Moore Jr., April 9, 2021
3. A Story Told by Our Totem Pole Marker
This is to left of Museum, and appears on the plaque as well. On the plaque, the building has an apparently-Christmastime wreath. A sundial is seen up front.
A Story Told by Our Totem Pole Marker image. Click for full size.
By Carl Gordon Moore Jr., April 9, 2021
4. A Story Told by Our Totem Pole Marker
Facing from Museum front toward the Susquehanna River.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 16, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 11, 2021, by Carl Gordon Moore Jr. of North East, Maryland. This page has been viewed 27 times since then. Last updated on April 13, 2021, by Carl Gordon Moore Jr. of North East, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 11, 2021, by Carl Gordon Moore Jr. of North East, Maryland. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.

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May. 14, 2021