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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Irish Americans

Seneca Village Community

 
 
Irish Americans wayside image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2020
1. Irish Americans wayside
Inscription.  
Irish-American families were scattered throughout Seneca Village, accounting for roughly one third of the population during the 1850s. In the vicinity of this sign, the western side of the village, was a cluster of at least three Irish-American households headed by John Gallagher, Mike Barlow, and Jane Allen. Gallagher and his family occupied a one-and-a-half story house with a stable nearby, while Mike Barlow and his wife lived in a much smaller shanty. Jane Allen and her daughter are thought to have lived in another shanty owned by Mike Riely.

Irish immigrants began to settle in Seneca Village beginning in the 1840s. They most likely came to the United States as part of a wave of immigration that began in the 1820s and peaked during the late 1840s in response to the Irish Potato Famine. Many rural Irish families, fleeing desperate living conditions in their homeland, poured into the major port cities of the eastern United States. Over a million refugees left Ireland for North America during the period, with approximately three-quarters of the entering through New York City. Irish immigrants lived in other parts of the future park
Irish Americans wayside site image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2020
2. Irish Americans wayside site
Like most Seneca Village sites, there are no physical remains or representations to be had.
Click or scan to see
this page online
site including a smaller settlement further south between 68th and 72nd Streets, which one newspaper called “Pigtown”.
 
Erected 2020 by Central Park Conservancy.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Parks & Recreational AreasSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 40° 47.024′ N, 73° 58.173′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker can be reached from West 84th Street east of Central Park West. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Central Park, New York NY 10024, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. All Angels’ Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Summit Rock (within shouting distance of this marker); The Wilson House (within shouting distance of this marker); Lanes, Lots and Streets (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Discover Seneca Village (about 300 feet away); Searching for Seneca Village (about 300 feet away); Seneca Village Community (about 300 feet away); Seneca Village Landscape (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
Also see . . .
1. Seneca Village. Wikipedia entry (Submitted on April 23, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 

2. Seneca Village Site. Central Park Conservancy website entry:
Links to several related sub-topics (Submitted on April 23, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.)
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2020
3. Inset
Top left: Although Mike Riely’s name is on this map, researchers believe that Jane Allen actually lived in this shanty, perhaps renting from Riley. Allen, 45, lived with her 18-year-old daughter, Ann. Both came to the United States around 1850. Nothing is known about Riely. He does not appear in any of the census records and this absence is a reminder that the historical record is often confusing and unrevealing.

Top right: Mike Barlow, a laborer, and his wife, Ann, occupied a shanty barely 170 square feet in plan, which was quite small by today’s standards but comparable to other houses in Seneca Village. They came to the United States around 1847 and 1851, respectively. it is unclear if they owned or rented this house.

Bottom left: John Gallagher owned a more substantial house than some of the others in the vicinity. He lived with his wife, Ann, and their young children, Eliza and Edward. Ann’s father, Patrick Donahue, lived with the family. John made his living as a shoemaker, perhaps working from his home and servicing his neighbors and passers-by on Eight Avenue.
 

3. Seneca Village, New York City. National Park Service entry (Submitted on April 23, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 
 
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2020
4. Inset
Census records reveal that John Gallagher was a naturalized citizen and suggest that his family were the first Irish immigrants to settle in Seneca Village. John and his wife, Ann, emigrated to the United States prior to 1840 and their children were born in New York.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 26, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 23, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 46 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 23, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.

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May. 15, 2021