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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Danville, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Caswell County, NC

 
 
Caswell County, NC Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 23, 2021
1. Caswell County, NC Marker
Inscription.  
Caswell County, North Carolina, was established in 1777 and named for Richard Caswell, the state's first governor. It is located on the northern border of North Carolina adjoining Danville, Virginia.

Attractions
Caswell County Civic Center Since 1979, the Caswell County Civic Center, located at the intersection of NC 62 and US 158 in Yanceyville, North Carolina, has set the stage for the civic, social, and cultural life of the entire Northern Piedmont. With a full-size professionally equipped stage, 912 seat auditorium, meeting and banquet facilities for up to 500, lobby art gallery, professional staff and a full complement of technical equipment and support services, this is the facility of choice for everything from Broadway shows and corporate retreats to social events for groups of 10 or 1,000.

The Richmond-Miles Museum
located in the Graves-Florence-Gatewood house on Main Street in Yanceyville, North Carolina, was the home of the late Caswell artist, Maude Gatewood, and is now the headquarters for the Caswell County Historical Association. Information and walking tour pamphlets

Caswell County, NC Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 23, 2021
2. Caswell County, NC Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
are available at the Museum and at www.ncccha.org.

Historical Markers
Thomas Day ca. 1801-1861 was a free black cabinetmaker in Milton, 1824-1861. His home and shop were located in the old Union Tavern, 1848-1858. NC 62/57 (Broad Street) in Milton.

Bright Leaf Tobacco was discovered on a farm in this area. Abisha Slade perfected a process for curing yellow tobacco. His slave, Stephen, discovered the process in 1839. SR 1511 (Blanch Road) west of Blanch.

Caswell Courthouse was erected about 1861. The murder here of Senator J.W. Stephens in 1870 led to martial law and Kirk-Holden "War." US 158 in Yanceyville.

Bedford Brown was a U.S. Senator from 1829-40. He was a state legislator and opponent of secession, 1860. Rose Hill was his home. US 158 north of Locust Hill.

Romulus M. Saunders, Minister to Spain from 1845 to 1849, was was a congressman, judge, legislator and political leader. His home is on NC 62 southwest of Milton.

Bartlett Yancey was a state legislator and political leader who died in 1828. His home and grave are on US 158 west of Yanceyville.

Red House Church This Presbyterian church was founded in the mid-18th century. Hugh McAden, its noted pastor, was buried in the churchyard in 1781. One mile south on NC 57 at Semora.

Calvin Graves was a

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Speaker of the N.C. House of Commons and Senate. He cast the deciding vote for the North Carolina Railroad in 1849. This was his home. NC 150 and SR 1128 (Wagonwheel Road) at Locust Hill.

Solomon Lea, the first President of Greensboro College from 1846-47, was founder and master of the Somerville Female Institute, 1848-1892. His home stands 100 yards north of US 158 at Leasburg.

Bethesda Church is a Presbyterian church that began as Hart's Chapel about 1765 and is the mother of many churches. The present building erected in 1944 stands 3/4 south of US 158 at SR 1153 (Bethesda Church Road) west of Yanceyville.

Jacob Thompson was the Secretary of Interior, 1857-1861, a Confederate agent in Canada and the U.S. Representative from Mississippi. His birthplace stands 100 yards southeast of US 158 at Leasburg.

William L. Poteat was Wake Forest College President, 1905-1927, and a champion of freedom of scientific though. His birthplace and family home is on NC 62 northeast of Yanceyville.

Griers Presbyterian Church was organized in 1753. Rev. Hugh McAden served as its first minister. The present building dates from 1856 and stands 1 mile east of NC 119 northeast of Hightowers.

Archibald Debow Murphey was an advocate for improved schools, roads, canals. He was a jurist, teacher and legislator. Born 7/10 miles

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south of NC 57 and NC 199 at Semora.

Washington's Southern Tour George Washington's last overnight stop in North Carolina on June 3, 1791, was at the home of Dudley Gatewood, which stood 1 mile N.E. NC 86 and SR 1503 (Walters Mill Road) at Gatewood.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansAgricultureIndustry & CommerceWar, US Civil. A significant historical date for this entry is June 3, 1791.
 
Location. 36° 34.875′ N, 79° 23.982′ W. Marker is in Danville, Virginia. Marker is on Sutherlin Avenue just south of Main Street (Virginia Route 293), on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 975 Main St, Danville VA 24541, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Halifax County, VA (here, next to this marker); Pittsylvania County (a few steps from this marker); Danville Attractions (within shouting distance of this marker); Anne Eliza Johns (within shouting distance of this marker); Sutherlin Mansion (within shouting distance of this marker); The Sutherlin House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Last Capitol of the Confederacy (within shouting distance of this marker); The John T. Watson, Jr. House (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Danville.

 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 26, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 26, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 27 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 26, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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May. 14, 2021