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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Buckhorn in Grant County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

You're Looking at Wilderness .. the First Wilderness!

 
 
You're Looking at Wilderness .. the First Wilderness! Marker image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of Thomas P. Martin, March 11, 2010
1. You're Looking at Wilderness .. the First Wilderness! Marker
Inscription.  Thanks, Aldo Leopold, for showing us the importance of wilderness.

As a Forest Ranger, hunter and ecologist, Leopold saw the need to protect the wild lands he enjoyed and valued. Wilderness, to Leopold, was an area still wild enough and big enough to travel on horseback for two weeks without crossing any roads or seeing other signs of human development. He found that the Gila Forest was big enough and still wild enough to do this. In 1924, he persuaded the Forest Service to set aside 755,000 acres of the Gila so people in the future could have this experience as well. This became our country's first designated wilderness.
Wilderness areas are, first of all, a series of sanctuaries for the primitive arts of wilderness travel... I suppose some will wish to debate whether it is important to keep these primitive arts alive. I shall not debate it. Either you know it in your bones, or you are very, very old. — A. Leopold
Man always kills the thing he loves, and so we the pioneers have killed our wilderness. Some say we had to. Be that as it may, I am glad I shall never be young without
Aldo Leopold image. Click for full size.
By Howard Zahniser / Public domain, 1946
2. Aldo Leopold
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wild country to be young in. Of what avail are forty freedoms without a blank spot on the map? — A. Leopold
The Wilderness Act of 1964 describes wilderness as a place where the land is affected primarily by the forces of nature, a place where humans are only visitors. To go into the wilderness, you will need to walk or ride on a horse or mule, just as people have always done. Wilderness gives you a way to step back in time, to experience the solitude and majesty of the natural world.

Captions
Left: Aldo Leopold worked for the Forest Service in Arizona and New Mexico between 1909 and 1924.
Right: Aldo Leopold was also a noted philosopher, writer and teacher. His classic book A Sand County Almanac, published in 1949, is one of the most widely read and respected books about the natural world.
 
Erected by United States Forest Service.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: EnvironmentParks & Recreational Areas. A significant historical year for this entry is 1924.
 
Location. 33° 11.035′ N, 108° 49.752′ W. Marker is near Buckhorn, New Mexico, in Grant County. Marker can be reached from Leopold Vista Road west of U.S. 180. Marker is in the Aldo Leopold Vista Picnic Area. Touch for map. Marker is in
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this post office area: Buckhorn NM 88025, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Catwalk (approx. 10 miles away); Mogollon (approx. 13.1 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Aldo Leopold (Wikipedia). (Submitted on April 29, 2021, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.)
2. About the Forest. From the U.S. Forest Service's Gila National Forest website. (Submitted on April 29, 2021, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 29, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 29, 2021, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 42 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 29, 2021, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

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May. 11, 2021