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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Williamsville in Bath County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Land and Natural Resources of Bath County

 
 
The Land and Natural Resources of Bath County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, May 8, 2021
1. The Land and Natural Resources of Bath County Marker
Inscription.  
Atop Warm Springs Mountain, one gazes across a see of ridges rolling to the horizon — an unexpected, unbroken forest in a well-traversed part of America. The view was much the same for the Algonquins, who called these mountains allegheny, meaning "endless." To those native people, these seemingly endless mountains and valleys were sacred hunting and fishing grounds. Early colonists followed in their footsteps along well-worn bison and game trails, discovering the thermal springs for which this mountain is named.

Today, these historic highlands are also recognized as one of North America's richest natural treasures and are home to one of the healthiest, most biologically diverse forests in the world. These forests shelter cool headwater streams that deliver clean water to larger rivers, and eventually to millions of people in the East. One of those rivers, the Cowpasture, lies in a valley in front of you. Widely considered Virginia's most pristine river, it winds freely for some 75 miles through a rural landscape of farm fields and pastures. The Cowpasture and Jackson rivers merge near the town of Iron Gate to form the James

The Land and Natural Resources of Bath County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, May 8, 2021
2. The Land and Natural Resources of Bath County Marker
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River, which flows on to the Chesapeake Bay.

Warm Springs Mountain and lands stretching for miles to the east originally comprised the Douthat Survey, a vast colonial land grant. Now much of this landscape is part of the George Washington National Forest, Douthat State Park, several state wildlife management areas, or The Nature Conservancy's Warm Springs Mountain Preserve, which immediately surrounds this overlook.
 
Erected by Virginia Department of Transportation.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraNative AmericansNatural ResourcesSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 38° 3.063′ N, 79° 45.969′ W. Marker is near Williamsville, Virginia, in Bath County. Marker is at the intersection of Ingalls Overlook Trail and Mountain Valley Road (Virginia Route 39), on the right when traveling north on Ingalls Overlook Trail. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Williamsville VA 24487, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Life at the Tollhouse (here, next to this marker); The Turnpike Movement in Virginia, 1825-1835 (here, next to this marker); The Virginia Springs Resorts (a few steps from this marker); Settlement on Warm Springs Mountain (a few

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steps from this marker); The Rev. Dr. William H. Sheppard (approx. 0.8 miles away); Early Bath County Courthouses (approx. 0.8 miles away); Terrill Hill (approx. 0.8 miles away); Mary Johnston (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Williamsville.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 9, 2021. It was originally submitted on May 9, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 26 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 9, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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Jun. 18, 2021