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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Chinook in Pacific County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

The Business of Trade

 
 
The Business of Trade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, June 27, 2021
1. The Business of Trade Marker
Inscription.  The Chinook commanded the mouth of the Columbia and lands up the coast to Willapa Bay in the north and down the coast to Tillamook head in the south going back centuries. They lived at the heart of a vast trade network, and served as middlemen, who exchanged salmon, other raw materials and finished goods with tribal neighbors. The fishing harvest fueled the trade: men hooked and speared the salmon, sturgeon and eulachon, while women skinned, gutted and dried the fish, finely pounded them, and stuffed batches of as much as eighty pounds into baskets. The pounded salmon would keep up to three years and was full of protein and fat — highly desired by others because of its premium quality.

The same network provided much more than materials for daily life — trade relations facilitated marriages, the exchange of information, the development of art and the mingling of cultures. This vigorous trade network likely fueled the pace of innovation in the region. As goods traveled, so did new ideas, social practices and technological developments that drove a sophisticated economy.

Captions (top to bottom)
• The lower Columbia
The Business of Trade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, June 27, 2021
2. The Business of Trade Marker
Marker is lower left corner.
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River valley was the primary homeland of Chinookan-speaking people. Some Salish- and Athapaskan-speaking people also lived there, and the groups often intermarried, traded and came together to fish. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
• Waterways provided a network of trade routes that spread hundreds of miles along the coast as far as Vancouver Island and inland to Puget Sound, Hood Canal and Celilo Falls. Northwestern University Library, Edward S. Curtis's 'The Native American Indians': the Photographic Images, 2001
• Chinese traders brought coins to the Northwest, like this one dating to the Qianlong era (1736-1795). Other trade items have been found at archaeological sites throughout the region, indicating long term Chinook contact with Asia. NPS Collections
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceNative AmericansWaterways & Vessels. A significant historical year for this entry is 2001.
 
Location. 46° 14.818′ N, 123° 54.606′ W. Marker is near Chinook, Washington, in Pacific County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 101, 1.7 miles west of State Route 401, on the right when traveling west. Marker is in the Middle Village/Station Camp Park wayside. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 354 US-101, Chinook WA 98614, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance
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of this marker. In Search of Recognition (a few steps from this marker); How Do These Stories Continue? (a few steps from this marker); St. Mary's Church (within shouting distance of this marker); The Search for the Northwest Passage / Jefferson's Mission Accomplished (within shouting distance of this marker); A Collision of Cultures / How Did They Live? (within shouting distance of this marker); What Are the First Stories of This Place? (within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to Middle Village (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Columbia (approx. ¾ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chinook.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 15, 2021. It was originally submitted on July 15, 2021, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 73 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 15, 2021, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

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Dec. 1, 2021