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Mims in Brevard County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Freedom Riders

Camp Blanding Museum & Memorial Park

 
 
Freedom Riders Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brandon D Cross, July 21, 2021
1. Freedom Riders Marker
Inscription.  
On May 4, 1961, a group of 13 African-American and white civil rights activists launched the Freedom Rides, a series of bus trips through the American South to protest segregation in interstate bus terminals. The Freedom Riders, who were recruited by the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), a U.S. civil rights group, departed from Washington, D.C., and attempted to integrate facilities at bus terminals along the way into the Deep South. African-American Freedom Riders tried to use “whites-only” restrooms and lunch counters, and vice versa.

In the first few days, the riders encountered only minor hostility, but in the second week the riders were severely beaten. Outside Annison, Alabama, one of their buses was burned, and in Birmingham several dozen whites attacked the riders only two blocks from the sheriff’s office. With the intervention of the U.S. Justice Department, most of CORE's Freedom Riders were evacuated from Birmingham, Alabama to New Orleans. John Lewis, a former seminary student who would later lead SNCC and become a US congressman, stayed in Birmingham.

CORE Leaders decided that letting violence end
Freedom Riders Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brandon D Cross, July 21, 2021
2. Freedom Riders Marker
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the trip would send the wrong signal to the country. They reinforced the pair of remaining riders with volunteers, and the trip continued. The group traveled from Birmingham to Montgomery without incident, but on their arrival in Montgomery they were savagely attacked by a mob of more than 1000 whites. The extreme violence and the indifference of local police prompted a national outcry of support for the riders, putting pressure on President Kennedy to end the violence.

The riders continued to Mississippi, where they endured further brutality and jail terms but generated more publicity and inspired dozens more Freedom Rides. By the end of the summer, the protests had spread to train stations and airports across the South., and in November, the Interstate Commerce Commission issued rules prohibiting segregated transportation facilities.
 
Erected by Harry T. & Harriette V. Moore Memorial Park.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansCivil RightsRoads & Vehicles. A significant historical date for this entry is May 4, 1961.
 
Location. 28° 39.225′ N, 80° 50.685′ W. Marker is in Mims, Florida, in Brevard County. Marker can be reached from 2180 Freedom Avenue, 0.3 miles south of Parker Street, on the right when traveling south. The marker stands
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within the Harry T. & Harriette V. Moore Memorial Park and Museum. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2180 Freedom Avenue, Mims FL 32754, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Voting Rights Act (a few steps from this marker); March On Washington (within shouting distance of this marker); Groveland Four (within shouting distance of this marker); Rosa Parks (within shouting distance of this marker); Brown v. Board of Education (within shouting distance of this marker); National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (within shouting distance of this marker); Little Rock Nine (within shouting distance of this marker); Harry Tyson Moore (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mims.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 10, 2021. It was originally submitted on August 6, 2021, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. This page has been viewed 105 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 6, 2021, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.

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Jan. 31, 2023