Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lynchburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

European Immigrants

 
 
European Immigrants Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, August 14, 2021
1. European Immigrants Marker
Inscription.  
Buried throughout the cemetery are hundreds of European immigrants who came to Lynchburg and the surrounding counties, ca. 1820-1920. They sailed to America seeking economic opportunity and refuge from war and famine, from countries including Ireland, Germany, Scotland, England, and Italy. They made important and diverse contributions to Lynchburg during their lives, and are an integral part of the cemetery today.

Three-quarters of the immigrants buried here are Irish. Most were laborers who found work building Lynchburg's impressive canal and rail systems. Like the Griffen family from County Kerry in southwest Ireland, they could not afford private plots elsewhere, and thus were buried here, in the city's Potter's Field. This section, used ca. 1840-1910, is located across this side of the cemetery towards the exit drive fence. 🢄 Other Irish immigrants became very successful artisans and businessmen, like the master stone mason James Scurry (1820-1869). His massive stone and ironwork family plot is along the left side of the entrance drive. 🢂

Francis A. Friedhoff (1796-1865) came with his family from
European Immigrants Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, August 14, 2021
2. European Immigrants Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
Prussia (modern Germany) in 1838, and began working in Lynchburg as a sockmaker and locksmith. His grave marker has not survived time and weather, but the gravestone of his son, Herman, still stands farther down the hill. 🢅 Herman A. Friedhoff (1830-1887) was a sockmaker and gunsmith, and a veteran of the Confederate Army.

The small Ambrozini ironwork enclosure near the Gatehouse 🢄 marks the grave of James Ambrozini (1806-1859), a grocer and one of Lynchburg's first Italian citizens. He came from the city of Trieste, then part of Austria, in the late 1840s.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesIndustry & CommerceSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil. A significant historical year for this entry is 1838.
 
Location. 37° 24.838′ N, 79° 9.321′ W. Marker is in Lynchburg, Virginia. Marker can be reached from Taylor Street north of 4th Street when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 400 Taylor St, Lynchburg VA 24501, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Josiah Holbrook (here, next to this marker); James River Suicide (a few steps from this marker); William Henry "Billy" Rhodes (a few steps from this marker); War of 1812 Veterans (a few steps from this marker); Dr. Phillip F. Morris
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
(a few steps from this marker); The Early Mayors (a few steps from this marker); Revolutionary War Soldiers (a few steps from this marker); The Beale Treasure (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lynchburg.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 18, 2021. It was originally submitted on August 18, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 42 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 18, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=179732

Paid Advertisement
Nov. 28, 2021