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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Galveston in Galveston County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Al Edwards / Juneteenth Celebration

 
 
Al Edwards / Juneteenth Celebration Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 14, 2021
1. Al Edwards / Juneteenth Celebration Marker
Inscription.  On June 19, 1865, at the close of the Civil War, U.S. Army General Gordon Granger issued an order in Galveston stating that the 1863 Emancipation Proclamation was in effect. That event, later known as "Juneteenth," marked the end of slavery in Texas. Celebrated as a day of freedom since then, Juneteenth grew into an international commemoration and in 1979 became an official Texas holiday through the efforts of State Representative Albert (Al) Edwards of Houston.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansCivil RightsWar, US Civil. A significant historical date for this entry is June 19, 1865.
 
Location. 29° 18.013′ N, 94° 47.556′ W. Marker is in Galveston, Texas, in Galveston County. Marker is at the intersection of Broadway (State Highway 87) and 24th Street, on the right when traveling west on Broadway. The statue and marker are located at the southeast corner on the grounds of 1859 Ashton Villa home. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2328 Broadway, Galveston TX 77550, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ashton Villa, 1859 (within shouting distance of this marker); The Eugenia & George Sealy Pavilion
Al Edwards / Juneteenth Celebration Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 14, 2021
2. Al Edwards / Juneteenth Celebration Marker
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(within shouting distance of this marker); The Rosenberg Library (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); J.F. Smith House (about 400 feet away); First Baptist Church of Galveston (about 500 feet away); Original Oleander Planting in Galveston (about 600 feet away); J. Levy & Bro. (about 700 feet away); St. Joseph's Church (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Galveston.
 
Also see . . .
1. General Order No. 3.
General Order No. 3 transmitted the news of the Emancipation Proclamation to the residents of the U.S. state of Texas and freed all remaining enslaved people in the state. The general order was issued by Union general Gordon Granger on June 19, 1865, at Ashton Villa upon arriving at Galveston, Texas, more than a month after the formal end of the American Civil War and two years after the original issuance of the Emancipation Proclamation. The announcement and Granger's enforcement of the order is the central event commemorated by the holiday of Juneteenth, which originally celebrated the end of slavery in Texas.
Source: Wikipedia
The view of the Al Edwards / Juneteenth Celebration Marker from the sidewalk image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 14, 2021
3. The view of the Al Edwards / Juneteenth Celebration Marker from the sidewalk
(Submitted on August 22, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

2. Juneteenth.
Juneteenth is a federal holiday in the United States commemorating the emancipation of African-American slaves. It is also often observed for celebrating African-American culture. Originating in Galveston, Texas, it has been celebrated annually on June 19 in various parts of the United States since 1865. The day was recognized as a federal holiday on June 17, 2021, when President Joe Biden signed the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act into law.
Source: Wikipedia
(Submitted on August 22, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
Additional commentary.
1. General Order No. 3
The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness
The view of the Ashton Villa home from the marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 14, 2021
4. The view of the Ashton Villa home from the marker
either there or elsewhere.
    — Submitted August 22, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 19, 2022. It was originally submitted on August 22, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 160 times since then and 115 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 22, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Jun. 29, 2022