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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Corpus Christi in Nueces County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

George Owens

 
 
George Owens Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, September 1, 2021
1. George Owens Marker
Inscription.  After the War Department issued General Order 329 in October 1863, African Americans had the opportunity to fight in the Union Army. George Owens, born enslaved in 1843 in Kentucky, took this opportunity. Owens enlisted in the Union Army on June 28, 1864, most likely after his owner freed him. From 1864 to 1866, George Owens served in Company F of the 116th Colored Infantry. In 1865, the 116th participated in the Appomattox campaign, a series of battles that led to the defeat of the Confederacy.

When the Civil War ended, Congress authorized the creation of the 9th Cavalry, one of the new African American Regiments. On October 7, 1866, Owens left the 116th and joined the 9th Cavalry. These men, called Buffalo Soldiers by Plains Native Americans, served in west and southwest Texas. Owens and his fellow soldiers served during the Indians wars (1866-1891), major frontier campaigns against Native Americans used to continue westward expansion. These campaigns, however, contributed to the harmful, violent process of Native American removal in the 19th century. Soon after Owens joined, Troop F of the 9th Cavalry was sent to Fort Davis.
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While serving, the 9th rebuilt forts and protected stagecoaches, railroad crews and trains, and surveying parties from hostile forces. Many soldiers in the 9th Cavalry received the Medal of Honor, making it the most honored African American unit. Owens was discharged from the 9th Cavalry in the early 1870s. After his service, he settled in Corpus Christi and died soon after on June 4, 1879. Along with approximately 180,000 other African Americans, George Owens served in the Union Army and fought for his and other enslaved people's freedom. Additionally, his service in the 9th Cavalry highlights African American's historical significance in United States military history.
 
Erected 2017 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 20157.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansForts and CastlesWar, US CivilWars, US Indian. A significant historical date for this entry is June 28, 1864.
 
Location. 27° 48.058′ N, 97° 23.933′ W. Marker is in Corpus Christi, Texas, in Nueces County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Ramirez Street and Padre Street. The marker is located in the east section of the Old Bayview Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1150 Ramirez Street, Corpus Christi TX 78401, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance
George Owens Marker and gravestone image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, September 1, 2021
2. George Owens Marker and gravestone
of this marker. Thomas S. Parker (a few steps from this marker); Old Bayview Mesquite (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Bayview Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Matthew Nolan (within shouting distance of this marker); Explosion of the Steamship Dayton (within shouting distance of this marker); James Downing (within shouting distance of this marker); William Henderson Maltby (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); William DeRyee (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Corpus Christi.
 
Also see . . .  Buffalo Soldiers.
Buffalo soldiers was the name given by the Plains Indians to the four regiments of African Americans, and more particularly to the two cavalry regiments, that served on the frontier in the post-Civil War army. More than 180,000 black soldiers had seen service in segregated regiments in the Union Army during the Civil War, and many units had achieved outstanding combat records.  Source: The Handbook of Texas
(Submitted on October 2, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
The view of the George Owens Marker in the cemetery image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, September 1, 2021
3. The view of the George Owens Marker in the cemetery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 2, 2021. It was originally submitted on October 2, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 258 times since then and 71 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 2, 2021, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Jun. 16, 2024