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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Arcadia in Carroll County, Iowa — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Influence of Railroads and Elevation

 
 
Influence of Railroads and Elevation Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, June 30, 2021
1. Influence of Railroads and Elevation Marker
Inscription.  
Union Pacific Railroad in Iowa
Iowa crews began laying the first rails in 1854. A year later, the first locomotive was shipped across the Mississippi River by ferry. As with the Pacific line, the U.S. government was instrumental in funding railroad construction in Iowa. The Chicago, Iowa and Nebraska Railroad, which later became the Chicago and North Western Railway Co., was the first company to span the state.

The completion of the C&NW into Council Bluffs, Iowa, made it possible for Union Pacific to receive supplies by rail. This was a major advantage over the earlier route by steamboat or wagon from St. Joseph, Mo., to Council Bluffs. The infusion of supplies supported the major advances in construction from 1867 to 1869.

Railroad Named Stops for Changes in Elevation
During the early days of steam locomotives, water stops were necessary every 7-10 miles and consumed much travel time. In Carroll and Crawford Counties in western Iowa, as the elevation changes, the railroad named one stop as East Side; the high point as Tip-Top; and the other side as West Side. Over time, Tip-Top
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became the town of Arcadia and West Side became Westside. East Side failed to prosper and faded from view as steam engines became more efficient and could travel further without stopping.

Missouri and Mississippi Divide in Iowa
Because of a change in elevation, western Iowa has its own Continental Divide with rivers to the east traveling to the Mississippi River and the rivers to the west traveling to the Missouri River. The Missouri River eventually flows into the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri.
 
Erected by Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway; Union Pacific; Humanities Iowa; and National Endowment for the Humanities.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Railroads & StreetcarsRoads & VehiclesSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels. In addition, it is included in the Lincoln Highway series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1854.
 
Location. 42° 4.665′ N, 95° 1.721′ W. Marker is near Arcadia, Iowa, in Carroll County. Marker is on Lincoln Highway (U.S. 30) 0.3 miles east of Delta Avenue (County Road M68), on the left when traveling east. Marker is located in a pull-out on the north side of the highway. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Arcadia IA 51430, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 14 miles of this
Marker detail: C.G.W. Bridge, Carroll, Iowa image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: C.G.W. Bridge, Carroll, Iowa
In 1913, the Lincoln Highway followed the Union Pacific through Iowa and copied their idea for raised beds.
marker, measured as the crow flies. Lest We Forget (approx. 3.3 miles away); World's War Soldiers (approx. 3.3 miles away); Eugene Kock Memorial Park (approx. 3½ miles away); Westside (approx. 3½ miles away); The Miracle Cornfield Landing of 1960 (approx. 8.8 miles away); Manning Freedom Rock Veterans Memorial (approx. 11.9 miles away); Veterans Memorial Wall Manning, Iowa (approx. 11.9 miles away); Slip Scraper (approx. 13.7 miles away).
 
Marker detail: Arcadia Railroad Depot image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: Arcadia Railroad Depot
The railroad stop at the highpoint was named "Tip-Top" by the railroad. In 1871, it became known as Arcadia.
Marker detail: Elevation Levels image. Click for full size.
June 30, 2021
4. Marker detail: Elevation Levels
Vail • 1260 feet
Westside • 1394 feet
Arcadia • 1447 feet
Carroll • 1270 feet
Marker detail: “You Are Here” image. Click for full size.
5. Marker detail: “You Are Here”
With no mountain ranges in Iowa, the divides between river basins or "watersheds" are subtle. As you drive across the state, are you in the Upper Mississippi River Basin, or in the Missouri River basin?"
Marker detail: The Missouri River image. Click for full size.
6. Marker detail: The Missouri River
The Missouri River is the longest in North America at 2,341 miles. Beginning in Montana, it flows into the Mississippi River and eventually empties into the Gulf of Mexico.
Influence of Railroads and Elevation Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, June 30, 2021
7. Influence of Railroads and Elevation Marker
(marker is located on the Missouri-Mississippi Divide)
Missouri-Mississippi Divide Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, June 30, 2021
8. Missouri-Mississippi Divide Marker
This boulder marks the divide
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and was placed here by
John P. Minchen
Carroll, Iowa
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 19, 2021. It was originally submitted on November 19, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 379 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on November 19, 2021, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.

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Apr. 15, 2024