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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Concan in Uvalde County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Silver Mine Pass

 
 
Silver Mine Pass Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, December 21, 2021
1. Silver Mine Pass Marker
Inscription.  Named for silver mine opened near pass by Spaniards in 1700s or earlier. Ore was inferior, and mine was abandoned; but 14 shafts (some interconnecting) remain. Near the mine are remnants of a fortification made by 30 men under the leadership of James Bowie, later (1836) a hero of the Siege to the Alamo. In 1831, while at work at this mine, Bowies men repulsed a Comanche attack in a fierce, all day battle. Hero of the fight was Bowie's slave, "Black Jim Bowie," who risked his life by leaving the fortification to bring water to the besieged.
 
Erected 1968 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 4698.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansIndustry & CommerceNative AmericansWars, US Indian. A significant historical year for this entry is 1831.
 
Location. 29° 30.01′ N, 99° 43.295′ W. Marker is in Concan, Texas, in Uvalde County. Marker is at the intersection of State Highway 127 and U.S. 83, on the left when traveling east on State Highway 127. The marker is located at a small roadside
Silver Mine Pass Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, December 21, 2021
2. Silver Mine Pass Marker
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pullover off the highway. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 21488 TX-127, Concan TX 78838, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Saltpetre Mine, C.S.A. (here, next to this marker); Dry Frio Canyon (approx. 7.6 miles away); Lombardy Irrigation Ditch (approx. 9.3 miles away); Captain William Ware (approx. 13½ miles away); Waresville Cemetery (approx. 13½ miles away); Old Waresville (approx. 14 miles away); William Ware (approx. 14 miles away); Jones Cemetery (approx. 14.1 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Los Almagres Mine.
Stephen F. Austin, on his first trip to Texas, heard from Erasmo Seguín that there was a rich silver mine on the San Saba River and a gold mine on the Llano. Hearing again in Mexico City of the unworked ore deposit called Los Almagres "in the territory of Sansava," he sent soldiers to inspect it. They probably went to the wrong place. In 1829 the mythical "lost" silver mine of San Sabá began appearing on Austin's maps. A year later, Henry S. Tanner borrowed Austin's designation for his own famous Texas map. Its wide distribution resulted in "a rash of maps showing silver mines near the old Spanish fort." Austin, doubtless realizing the value of the legend in attracting immigrants, repeated
The Silver Mine Pass Marker is the marker on the right of the three markers image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, December 21, 2021
3. The Silver Mine Pass Marker is the marker on the right of the three markers
it in an 1831 promotional pamphlet. For years afterward it was mentioned in nearly every book about Texas.

James and Rezin Bowie, on their sallies into the Hill Country, reinforced the legend. Los Almagres was transformed into the "lost San Saba mine," then the "lost Bowie mine." Source: The Handbook of Texas
(Submitted on January 2, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 2, 2022. It was originally submitted on January 1, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 364 times since then and 47 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 2, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Feb. 5, 2023