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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Willow Park in Parker County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Lawson Daniel Gratz

 
 
Lawson Daniel Gratz Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Anderson, November 24, 2021
1. Lawson Daniel Gratz Marker
Inscription.  Born on September 15, 1839 in Mason County, Kentucky on the plantation of Benjamin Gratz, Lawson Gratz worked as a farmer for his owner prior to the Civil War. Lawson was directed by his owner to enlist in the Federal army on July 24, 1864 at Lexington, Kentucky. Enlistment papers show that Lawson had received some education as his papers displayed his own signature. After enlistment, he proceeded to Camp Nelson where Black soldiers were stationed and was soon promoted to first sergeant of Company C in the 114th U.S. Colored Infantry. Gratz served with the 114th at the Siege of Petersburg and Richmond and was present at the Appomattox Courthouse when Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered.

Gratz was discharged in May 1865 but reenlisted in August 1867 in the 10th U.S. Calvary, known as the Buffalo Soldiers. While assigned to maintain order in Indian Territory, Gratz was injured by exploding gunpowder and lost the sight in his right eye. Despite the injury, Gratz refused a discharge and completed his enlistment. Following his five-year enlistment, Gratz moved to Texas and headed to Fort Griffin where he worked as a civilian teamster hauling
Lawson Daniel Gratz Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Anderson, November 24, 2021
2. Lawson Daniel Gratz Marker
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buffalo hides to markets in Weatherford and Dallas. Gratz married sixteen-year-old Rosa Dedman, the daughter of a former slave and co-worker of Gratz, on September 27, 1877 at Fort Griffin in Albany, Shackelford County. The marriage lasted 32 years and produced 14 children. The Gratz family moved in 1892 from Shackelford County to Annetta in Parker County and purchased a small farm. Gratz died on June 18, 1909 and shall be remembered for his strong leadership and devotion to duty.
 
Erected 2011 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 16901.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansWar, US CivilWars, US Indian.
 
Location. 32° 44.904′ N, 97° 40.365′ W. Marker is in Willow Park, Texas, in Parker County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Interstate 20 Frontage Road and Mikus Road. Marker is located in the eastern side of Willow Springs Cemetery. To reach it enter through the gate to the right. A fence divides the two sides of the cemetery. The old Willow Springs Cemetery is segregated. Black men, women, and children were buried on the east side. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Weatherford TX 76087, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Annetta Cemetery (approx.
Lawson Daniel Gratz Grave Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Anderson, November 24, 2021
3. Lawson Daniel Gratz Grave Marker
2½ miles away); Isaac Parker (approx. 2.7 miles away); Hood Family Cemetery (approx. 3.4 miles away); Bankhead Highway in Aledo (approx. 4.8 miles away); First Baptist Church of Aledo (approx. 5.4 miles away); City of Aledo (approx. 5.4 miles away); Aledo United Methodist Church (approx. 5½ miles away); Gustavus Adolphus Holland (approx. 6.8 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Gratz, Lawson Daniel (unknown–1909) - The Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) (Submitted on November 25, 2021, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 5, 2022. It was originally submitted on November 25, 2021, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. This page has been viewed 225 times since then and 163 times this year. Last updated on January 3, 2022, by QuesterMark of Fort Worth, Texas. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 25, 2021, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.

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Jul. 2, 2022