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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Wimberley in Hays County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Jacob's Well Natural Area

A Historic Destination

 
 
Jacob's Well Natural Area Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, March 21, 2022
1. Jacob's Well Natural Area Marker
Inscription.  
Native Americans
There were three prominent Indian tribes that roamed the area surrounding Jacob's Well: the Tonkawa, the Jumano and later the Comanche. Early settlers eventually pushed out the Comanche. These groups were semi-nomadic, and as a result, little evidence remains today.

The Early Days
Jacob's Well Natural Area consists of five land surveys that use the spring as a corner to tie the properties together. Bartlett Sims conducted these surveys in 1847. The three surveys on this side of the spring were donated to the heirs of men that fought and died in the Goliad Massacre in 1836. In the early 1850s, William C. Winters, a San Jacinto veteran and early settler of Wimberley, hiked up Cypress Creek searching for its source and found an overflowing spring. It is said that Mr. Winters exclaimed, "like unto a well in Bible times." Thus it was named "Jacob's Well." Locals have been drawn to the cool, clear water of Jacob's Well spring since then. Jacob's Well remains a popular recreational destination today, drawing visitors from around the globe.

Wagon
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Travel
Before automobiles became widely popular, travel in the 1800s and early 1900s was done in horse-drawn vehicles like this buckboard wagon. Most country roads were bumpy dirt paths with two ruts worn by wagon wheels. In this photo: Southwest Texas Normal School students in route to their senior picnic at Jacob's Well in 1913. Notice Mt. Baldy in the distance, once known as Mt. Alberta, one of the Twin Sisters Mountains.

The Weir
After the drought of the 1950, a heavy rain washed gravel from the dry creek bed into Jacob's Well. Local landowners came together to finance a dragline to clean out the well. They then built a concrete weir (diversion wall) around the well to prevent it from filling in again. This weir still stands today.

Captions
Middle Left: Jacob's Well, 1909
Lower Left: Southwest Texas Normal School Senior Picnic Jacob's Well, 1913
Lower Center: Jacob's Well, 1912
Lower Right: Weir, June 2016
Photos Courtesy of Alison Tudor
 
Erected by Jacob's Well Natural Area.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Native AmericansParks & Recreational AreasRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1847.
 
Location.
The Jacob's Well Natural Area Marker on the ridge above Jacob’s Well image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, March 21, 2022
2. The Jacob's Well Natural Area Marker on the ridge above Jacob’s Well
30° 2.103′ N, 98° 7.591′ W. Marker is near Wimberley, Texas, in Hays County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Mt. Sharp Road (County Highway 220) and Whippoorwill Drive. The marker is located at the southern section of the Jacob's Well Natural Area 200, feet north of the Cypress Creek at Jacob's Well. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1699 Mt Sharp Road, Wimberley TX 78676, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Jacob's Well (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Jacobs Well Cemetery (approx. 0.7 miles away); Winters-Wimberley House (approx. 3.1 miles away); Wimberley Mills (approx. 3.1 miles away); James C. Lane House (approx. 3.3 miles away); John R. Dobie House (approx. 3.3 miles away); The Century-Old Wimberley Cemetery (approx. 3.3 miles away); Mt. Gainer (approx. 7˝ miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wimberley.
 
Also see . . .  Jacob's Well. Texas State Historical Association - Handbook of Texas (Submitted on March 22, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
The view down Jacob's Well from above image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, March 21, 2022
3. The view down Jacob's Well from above
The view of the Jacob's Well Natural Area Marker as approaching from the trail image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, March 21, 2022
4. The view of the Jacob's Well Natural Area Marker as approaching from the trail
The view of Cypress Creek from behind Jacob’s Well image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, March 21, 2022
5. The view of Cypress Creek from behind Jacob’s Well
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 23, 2022. It was originally submitted on March 22, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 210 times since then and 59 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on March 22, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on March 23, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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May. 31, 2023