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Laredo in Webb County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Fort McIntosh

 
 
Fort McIntosh Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 29, 2022
1. Fort McIntosh Marker
Inscription.  Established March 3, 1849, by troops of the 1st U.S. Infantry from Ringgold Barracks, under command of Lt. E.L. Viele. The star-shaped earthen fortress built on a bluff overlooking the Rio Grande (1/2 mile NW), was first called Camp Crawford, in honor of Secretary of War George W. Crawford. On Jan. 7, 1850, the name was changed to Fort McIntosh for Lt. Col. James S. McIntosh, who died Sept. 26, 1847, of wounds received two weeks earlier in the Mexican War Battle of Molino Del Rey.

During the 1850s, Fort McIntosh served as a vital link in the defense system along the Rio Grande frontier. The post was abandoned in March 1859, reoccupied in Jan. 1860, and abandoned again in April 1861, when the U.S. Army left Texas after secession. Soon after the Civil War, Fort McIntosh was reoccupied, and moved to this location in 1869. Until the mid-1880s, soldiers were involved in escort duty and scouting for raiding Indians and bandits on both sides of the Rio Grande.

After the turn of the century, the Fort McIntosh garrison was deployed along the border to prevent incursions by Mexican revolutionaries, and the post served as a training
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camp for soldiers who fought in both world wars. Fort McIntosh was discontinued as an army post on June 9, 1947, after 98 years of service.
 
Erected 1974 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 1996.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Forts and CastlesWar, US CivilWars, Non-USWars, US Indian. A significant historical date for this entry is March 3, 1849.
 
Location. 27° 30.5′ N, 99° 31.153′ W. Marker is in Laredo, Texas, in Webb County. Marker is at the intersection of Washington Street and Victoria Street, on the left when traveling south on Washington Street. The marker is located at a small park on the northeastern corner of the intersection. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Laredo TX 78040, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort McIntosh Barracks (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fort McIntosh Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away); Pvt. David Bennes Cantú Barkley (approx. 0.3 miles away); All U.S. Veterans Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away); Jovita Idar (approx. 0.4 miles away); El Primer Congreso Mexicanista (approx. half a mile away); Holding Institute (Laredo Seminary) (approx. half a mile away); Saint Peter the Apostle Catholic Church (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Laredo.
The Fort McIntosh Marker on the left image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 29, 2022
2. The Fort McIntosh Marker on the left

 
More about this marker. The marker is located on the campus of Laredo College which was originally the historic Fort McIntosh.
 
Also see . . .  Fort McIntosh, Texas. Wikipedia
The fort was abandoned by Federal troops at the outbreak of the American Civil War. The Battle of Laredo took place near the fort on March 19, 1864, when 72 men repelled three attacks from a force of 200 federal soldiers sent from Brownsville, Texas. On October 23, 1865, the post was reoccupied by federal troops of the 2nd Texas Cavalry.
(Submitted on August 1, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
The view of the Fort McIntosh Marker at the main entrance to Laredo College image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 29, 2022
3. The view of the Fort McIntosh Marker at the main entrance to Laredo College
Fort McIntosh Hosipital Building image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 29, 2022
4. Fort McIntosh Hosipital Building
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 1, 2022. It was originally submitted on July 31, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 141 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 1, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Apr. 21, 2024