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Glendive in Dawson County, Montana — The American West (Mountains)
 

Evidence Of The Expedition

Clark on the Yellowstone

 
 
Evidence Of The Expedition Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 27, 2022
1. Evidence Of The Expedition Marker
Inscription.  
Horses, Canoes and Bull Boats
Clark and his party traveled by horse along the north side of the Yellowstone River until July 24, when nine members began a float in two lashed-together canoes built from cottonwoods they found along the river. Sergeant Pryor and Privates Hall, Shannon and Windsor were sent overland with the party's remaining horses. When those horses were also lost, the four men walked to the Yellowstone River, near Pompeys Pillar. They then built bull boats from buffalo bull hides, on frames of branches that were lashed together. The men floated down the river and into the Missouri River, and rejoined Clark's group on August 8. They joined Lewis' party on August 12, south and east of present-day Williston, North Dakota.

July 20, 1806
"The horses being fatigued and their feet very Sore, I Shall let them rest a fiew days. dureing which time the party... will dress their Skins and make themselves Clothes to bare, as they are nearly naked."
"I deturmined to have two Canoes made out of the largest of those trees and lash them together which will Cause them to be Study and fully Sufficient to take
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my Small party & Self with what little baggage we have down this river"


July 21, 1806
"This morning I was informed that Half of our horses were absent."

July 23, 1806
"Sgt. pryor found an Indian Mockerson and a Small piece of a roab ... those Indian Signs is Conclusive with me that they have taken the 24 horses which we lost. ..."

July 24, 1806
"had all our baggage put on board of the two Small Canoes which when lashed together is very Study. ...at 8 A M we Set out..."

July 24, 1806
"on this Island I observd a large lodge… this Lodge a council lodge…”

July 24, 1806
"I had the horses drove across the river and Set Sergt. Pryor and his party across. ... my man York killed a Buffalow Bull, as he informed me for his tongue and marrow bones. for me to mention or give an estimate of the differant Spcies of wild animals on this river particularly Buffalow, Elk Antelopes & Wolves would be increditable. I shall therefore be silent on the Subject further"

July 25, 1806
"The nativs have ingraved on the face of this rock the figures of animals &c. near which I marked my name and the day of the month & year"

"I encamped on the Stard. Side imediately below the enteranc Shannons River [now known as Fly Creek] about 22 Yards wide, and at this time
Marker detail: Clark's Signature at Pompeys Pillar image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: Clark's Signature at Pompeys Pillar
discharges a great portion of water which is very Muddy."


"A Remarkable Rock"
The most significant incident that occurred during Clark's journey down the Yellowstone was on July 25, 1806, when he wrote, " ... 4 P M arived at a remarkable rock. ...This rock which I shall Call Pompys Tower [Pompeys Pillar]. . . I marked my name and the day of the month & year."

Clark's signature can be seen at Pompeys Pillar today. It is the only remaining on-site physical evidence along the entire route of the Corps of Discovery's 8,000-mile journey.

July 27, 1806
”when we pass the Big horn I take my leave of the view of tremendious chain of Rocky mountains white with Snow”
 
Erected by Lower Yellowstone Lewis & Clark Regional Committee; and Montana Lewis & Clark Commission.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AnimalsExplorationNative AmericansWaterways & Vessels. In addition, it is included in the Lewis & Clark Expedition series list. A significant historical date for this entry is July 25, 1806.
 
Location. 47° 7.513′ N, 104° 41.423′ W. Marker is in Glendive, Montana, in Dawson County. Marker is on Montana Avenue just north of State Street, on the left when traveling north. This is the center
Marker detail: Map Legend Key image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: Map Legend Key
of three markers in the Clark on the Yellowstone kiosk, located in an interpretive park on the east side of the Glendive Dinosaur and Fossil Museum. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 139 State Street, Glendive MT 59330, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Clark's Footprints To Eastern Montana's Future (here, next to this marker); Returning To The Plains (here, next to this marker); Orpha Zilpha Parke Bovee (approx. 1.1 miles away); Sacred Heart Church (approx. 1.7 miles away); First Methodist Episcopal Church and Parsonage (approx. 1.7 miles away); Dawson County World War Memorial (approx. 1.8 miles away); Dion Building / Exchange Bank (approx. 1.8 miles away); 107 West Bell Street (approx. 1.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Glendive.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Clark on the Yellowstone
 
Also see . . .
1. Clark’s Canoe Camp on the Yellowstone.
The party remained at the camp until July 24 building the canoes, hunting, and stitching new clothing from deer and elk skins. One night half of their horses disappeared. While Clark suspected it to be the work of an element from the Crow Tribe, no Crows were ever encountered and the missing horses were never recovered.
(Submitted on August 2, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
Evidence Of The Expedition Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 27, 2022
4. Evidence Of The Expedition Marker
(center of three markers in the Clark on the Yellowstone kiosk)
 

2. Pompeys Pillar National Monument.
The only remaining on-site physical evidence of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, Pompeys Pillar National Monument is managed by the Bureau of Land Management, and is about 30 miles northeast of Billings, Montana. The Interpretive Center presents the journey of William Clark and his detachment down the Yellowstone River in 1806.

Today, in addition to Clark’s engraving, Pompeys Pillar is marked with over 5,000 of other etchings, petroglyphs, and pictographs. The Pillar was used for centuries as a favored campsite by Crows and other Native peoples. Then throughout the 19th century, fur trappers, military expeditions, railroad workers, and early settlers used the sandstone as a registry of their passing.

(Submitted on August 2, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 2, 2022. It was originally submitted on August 1, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 108 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 2, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.

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Apr. 17, 2024