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Eutaw in Greene County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Thomas Earl Gilmore, Sr.

 
 
Thomas Earl Gilmore, Sr. Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, August 6, 2022
1. Thomas Earl Gilmore, Sr. Marker
Inscription.  On this site, in January 1971, Thomas Earl Gilmore, Sr. was sworn in as Sheriff of Greene County. He was the first African American Sheriff in the county's history and served three consecutive terms until he retired from local politics.

Gilmore, a native son of Forkland, worked tirelessly against Jim Crow Laws. He was beaten, arrested and jailed in Greene County during the struggle for human and civil rights.

Among the youngest in the country, he initially sought the office in 1966 at the age of 24. Due to voting irregularities, the election was encumbered in courts until after the election in 1970.

Recruited by members of Dr. King's SCLC staff, Gilmore was inspired to adopt a non-violent philosophy. He will forever be remembered as the “Sheriff without a Gun”.
 
Erected 2013 by Greene County Commission.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansCivil RightsLaw Enforcement. A significant historical month for this entry is January 1971.
 
Location. 32° 50.451′ N, 87° 53.248′ W. Marker is
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in Eutaw, Alabama, in Greene County. Marker is on Tuscaloosa Street (Alabama Route 14) east of Springfield Avenue, on the right when traveling east. Marker is on the north side of Greene County Courthouse Square. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Eutaw AL 35462, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A County Older Than The State, Greene County (a few steps from this marker); Welcome to Eutaw, Alabama: The Gateway To The Black Belt (within shouting distance of this marker); Greene County Veterans Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Matthew Leonard (within shouting distance of this marker); First Presbyterian Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Clinton Baptist Church (approx. 8 miles away); Boligee Presbyterian Church (approx. 10.3 miles away); Beulah Baptist Church (approx. 12.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Eutaw.
 
Also see . . .
1. Thomas Gilmore, the black sheriff of Greene County. Collection of 32 photographs taken by Bob Fitch of a 1965 march to integrate schools in Eutaw, Alabama. Among them is the famous photograph of then-Greene County Sheriff Bill Lee slapping Gilmore, one of the march organizers. (The Bob Fitch Photography Archive, Stanford University Libraries) (Submitted on August 12, 2022, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.) 

2. This Brave Cop was the Alabama Sheriff without a Gun.
Thomas Earl Gilmore, Sr. Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, August 6, 2022
2. Thomas Earl Gilmore, Sr. Marker
Filmmaker David Hoffman introduces and narrates his 1974 short documentary of Gilmore. (David Hoffman, uploaded June 30, 2020) (Submitted on August 12, 2022, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 12, 2022. It was originally submitted on August 12, 2022, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 270 times since then and 83 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 12, 2022, by Duane and Tracy Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

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Jun. 23, 2024