Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Burkittsville in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Confederate Forces

Munford’s Brigade and Mahone’s Brigade

 
 
Crampton’s Pass War Department Tablet C.P. 5 (Confederate Forces) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 21, 2007
1. Crampton’s Pass War Department Tablet C.P. 5 (Confederate Forces) Marker
Inscription.  
Confederate Forces
Col. T. T. Munford, 2nd Virginia Cavalry, Commanding,
Munford’s Brigade,
2nd & 12th Virginia Cavalry.
Mahone’s Brigade,
Lt. Col. Wm. A. Parham, 41st Virginia, Commanding.
6th, 12th, 16th, 41st, and 61st Virginia Infantry
(September 14, 1862)

Upon the approach of the Sixth Corps, Army of the Potomac, Munford’s Cavalry fell back through Jefferson and Burkittsville and prepared to dispute the passage of South Mountain. Mahone’s Brigade was marched over Crampton’s Pass from Pleasant Valley and put in position behind the stonewall and rail fences running north from this point. The Cavalry (dismounted) was disposed on either flank of Mahone's Infantry. Chew’s (Va.) Battery, and two guns of Grimes’ Portsmouth (Va.) Battery were placed about half way up the mountain and five guns of Manly’s (N. C.) Battery and Macon’s (Va.) Battery were placed in Brownsville Pass. About 3 P. M. Munford was attacked and for nearly three hours held position, then his line began to yield. As it retired up the mountain making several stands, it was reinforced by the 10th Georgia of Semmes’ Brigade and,
Crampton’s Pass War Department Tablet C.P. 5 (Confederate Forces) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 21, 2007
2. Crampton’s Pass War Department Tablet C.P. 5 (Confederate Forces) Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
when near the top, by Cobb’s Brigade; but the entire line gave way and retreated in disorder into Pleasant Valley.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number C.P. 5.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers series list.
 
Location. 39° 23.839′ N, 77° 38.128′ W. Marker is in Burkittsville, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is at the intersection of Gapland Road / West Main Street and Mountain Church Road, on the right when traveling west on Gapland Road / West Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Burkittsville MD 21718, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Burkittsville: Henry Burkitt’s Town (approx. 0.3 miles away); “Sealed With Their Lives” (approx. 0.3 miles away); Chew’s Ashby Artillery (approx. 0.3 miles away); Cobbled Stagecoach Stop (approx. 0.4 miles away); Burkittsville (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Confusion of Battle (approx. half a mile away); Gath's Empty Tomb (approx. 0.6 miles away); Mausoleum (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Burkittsville.
 
More about this marker. One of nine markers listed by the Antietam Battlefield Board as erected at Crampton’s Pass in the report dated 1898. Four are at the War Correspondence Memorial Arch, the remainder were placed between the Pass and Burkittsville to the east.(Source: George R. Large and Joe A. Swisher, “Battle of Antietam: The Official History by the Antietam Battlefield Board”)
 
Also see . . .
1. The Battle of Crampton's Gap. (Submitted on August 11, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
Mahone's Brigade Lines image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 5, 2007
3. Mahone's Brigade Lines
Near the present day Mountain Church Road ran a stone wall, part of the Arnold Farm. Mahone's Brigade deployed along the wall and defended here until forced back.

2. Historical Profile of the 12th Virginia, and Mahone's Brigade. (Submitted on August 11, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Additional commentary.
1. Gravity Hill (AKA Spooky Hill)
As a side note, right next to this marker, the road seemingly goes downhill but when your car is at the bottom of the "hill," and you place your transmission in neutral, your car rolls back up hill. The local story is that the Confederate military rolled their cannons up the hill and their ghosts are now pushing your car uphill. It is actually an optical illusion and nothing to do with gravity having an effect. Also the horror film, Blair Witch Project, was made nearby.
    — Submitted August 10, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 13, 2017. It was originally submitted on August 11, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,864 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 11, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.

Share This Page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=2045

Paid Advertisement
Apr. 16, 2021