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Hackberry in Lavaca County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Hackberry

 
 
Hackberry Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, September 15, 2022
1. Hackberry Marker
Inscription.  The Hackberry community was established by German immigrant Ludwig Eduard Neuhaus, who came to Texas in 1846, settling in northern Lavaca County. He encouraged and sponsored other German immigrants to settle in Hackberry, among those that joined him were his brothers, Franz and Hermann. Ludwig's vision was to bring Germans to the area who could contribute to and augment its German population.

Located along the Gonzales-San Felipe Road, a vital route running across northern Lavaca County, the settlement experienced steady growth. By the 1850s, the community was thriving. It had a saw mill, grist mill, and a general store, which Ludwig Neuhaus and his wife Auguste, ran out of their home. A Methodist Church, which was also used as a school, was established in 1861. Also in that year, the town received a post office and was officially named Hackberry for the trees located on Neuhaus property. Hackberry provided daily stages to Hallettsville and Schulenburg, and also featured a dance hall, slaughter house and dipping vat. Area settlers included large plantation owner W.G. Foley and James W. Robinson, who was provisional governor of Texas
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in 1836.

In the late 1800s, Hackberry began to decline when a railroad bypassed the town. The population dropped quickly. In 1935, the Neuhaus General Store closed. Only a few structures remained as vestiges of the community. Today Hackberry remains a link to the area's past as an agricultural community development.
 
Erected 2010 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 16465.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Roads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1846.
 
Location. 29° 34.473′ N, 96° 52.806′ W. Marker is in Hackberry, Texas, in Lavaca County. Marker is on Farm to Market Road 532, 0.3 miles south of County Highway 219, on the right when traveling south. The marker is located along the west side of the highway on a small pullout. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Schulenburg TX 78956, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Andrews Chapel Cemetery (approx. 1.1 miles away); Oakland Normal School (approx. 3½ miles away); Oakland (approx. 3½ miles away); Navidad Baptist Cemetery (approx. 4.6 miles away); Clear Creek Cemetery (approx. 5.6 miles away); Site of Former Town of Lyons
Hackberry Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, September 15, 2022
2. Hackberry Marker
(approx. 6 miles away); Site of Moravia School (approx. 6.4 miles away); SPJST Moravia Cemetery (approx. 6.4 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Robinson, James W. (1790–1857). Texas State Historical Association
James W. Robinson arrived in Texas in January 1833, with a letter of recommendation addressed to Stephen F. Austin, settled at Nacogdoches, and on October 6, 1835, received title to a league of land in Joseph Vehlein's colony in the area of present San Jacinto County. Robinson was a delegate from Nacogdoches to the Consultation in 1835 and was elected lieutenant governor of the provisional government. The executive council of the provisional government deposed Governor Henry Smith on January 11, 1836, and named Robinson as his successor.
(Submitted on September 16, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

2. Lavaca County. Texas State Historical Association
Some sources suggest that the earliest Europeans to set foot in the future Lavaca County may have been survivors of Pánfilo Narváez's expedition of 1528, most notably Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca. The earliest documented exploration of the region, however, was led by the Frenchman René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, who in 1685 landed on the coast and reportedly
The view of the Hackberry Marker along the highway image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, September 15, 2022
3. The view of the Hackberry Marker along the highway
named the Lavaca River Les Veches ("the cattle") because of the number of buffalo he saw grazing on its banks. The name was retained by the Spanish, who translated it La Baca. Later Spanish explorers may have crossed the county, but there is no record of other Europeans in the area until 1820.
(Submitted on September 16, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 16, 2022. It was originally submitted on September 16, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 179 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 16, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Apr. 21, 2024