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New Braunfels in Comal County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Heinrich Mordhorst

 
 
Heinrich Mordhorst Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, November 9, 2022
1. Heinrich Mordhorst Marker
Inscription.  Artisan and craftsman Heinrich (Henry) T. Mordhorst was born in 1864 to Heinrich and Louise Mordhorst in Rostock, Germany. The family immigrated to the U.S. in 1881, settling first in Pomeroy, Ohio, then later in New Braunfels. Learning the Earthenware trade from his father, Mordhorst established the Comal Earthenware Company along the nearby Comal River with partner Emil Heinen in 1906. He soon shifted his focus, though, to a relatively new building material: cement. As a cement finisher, he contributed to the development of New Braunfels in the first decades of the twentieth century, and his works included sidewalks, cellars, water troughs, curbing and cisterns, as well as the New Braunfels International & Great Northern Railroad Station and houses which were built of concrete blocks to look like shaped stone.

Mordhorst is perhaps most recognized for his distinctive grave covers and other funerary decorations. Working with cement and seashells, he created ornate and unusual designs, many adorned with large Atlantic Cockleshells obtained from suppliers in Rockport and Galveston on the Texas coast. Seen throughout the region, his
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covers featured rectangular bases with rounded tops, with shells often in linear rows. His grave decorations have been identified in cemeteries throughout central Texas and as far away as Orange Grove (Jim Wells Co.) in south Texas. Many of the best examples of his artistry are located in the Comal cemetery in New Braunfels.

Heinrich Mordhorst died on February 6, 1928, in New Braunfels. His lasting legacies as an artisan and craftsman are among his many contributions to the economic development and rich cultural heritage of his adopted hometown and county.
 
Erected 2013 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 17801.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Arts, Letters, MusicCemeteries & Burial SitesImmigrationIndustry & Commerce. A significant historical date for this entry is February 6, 1928.
 
Location. 29° 42.805′ N, 98° 6.569′ W. Marker is in New Braunfels, Texas, in Comal County. Marker is on Peace Avenue, 0.1 miles south of East Commerce Street, on the left when traveling south. The marker is located in the northwest section of the Comal German Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 301 Peace Avenue, New Braunfels TX 78130, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ferdinand J. Lindheimer (within shouting distance of this marker); Ferdinand Jacob Lindheimer
Heinrich Mordhorst Marker and Gravestone with Hulda Mordhorst’s Gravestone image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, November 9, 2022
2. Heinrich Mordhorst Marker and Gravestone with Hulda Mordhorst’s Gravestone
(within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to the Comal Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Notable People & Plots (within shouting distance of this marker); Comal County Fair (approx. ¼ mile away); Church Hill School Building (approx. 0.8 miles away); Breustedt House (approx. 0.8 miles away); Site of an Early Mill and Factory (approx. 0.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Braunfels.
 
The view of the Heinrich Mordhorst Marker in the cemetery image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, November 9, 2022
3. The view of the Heinrich Mordhorst Marker in the cemetery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 10, 2022. It was originally submitted on November 10, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 117 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 10, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Apr. 22, 2024