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Near Fannett in Jefferson County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Mayumi Legacy

 
 
The Mayumi Legacy Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, January 11, 2023
1. The Mayumi Legacy Marker
Inscription.  The modern Texas rice industry was shaped in part by the Mayumi brothers, who arrived here from Japan in the early twentieth century. Rice had been grown in limited quantities in Jefferson County since the 1840s, but production remained relatively low for decades. Many believed that with improved agricultural practices the crop could become successful in the region.

In 1902, Japanese Consul General Sadatsuchi Uchinda attended a Beaumont meeting of the Rice Growers Association of America, who offered an open invitation to Japanese rice farmers. Yoshio Mayumi, a banker and landowner from Mie Prefecture on the main island of Honshu, visited this area in 1904 and returned the following year to purchase more than 1700 acres near Taylor Bayou. Mayumi brought fifteen workers from his hometown, and the farming community included a three-story house for Mayumi's family, another building for the workmen and a community dance hall. Although Yoshio's only crop was rice, he also owned and raised livestock including hogs and cattle and to help with farm work, mules and horses.

The agricultural experiment showed early promise, but several
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factors led to its eventual decline. Yoshio returned to Japan in 1915 and left the operation to the management of his brother Yasuo. Economic difficulties and repressive immigration laws led the Mayumi family to sell the land in 1924. The Mayumi legacy centered on a family fondly remembered for its many contributions to the rural community, is important because it presaged the success of the Texas rice industry, which is today an economic mainstay of the upper Texas Gulf coast
 
Erected 2006 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 13440.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AgricultureImmigrationIndustry & Commerce. A significant historical year for this entry is 1902.
 
Location. 29° 52.882′ N, 94° 13.413′ W. Marker is near Fannett, Texas, in Jefferson County. Marker is at the intersection of Boondocks Road and Patterson Road, on the left when traveling north on Boondocks Road. The marker is located in front of the large blue water tower. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 14124 Boondocks Road, Beaumont TX 77705, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 15 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Leo Edward Craigen (approx. 2.9 miles away); Hamshire House (approx. 4.2 miles away); Town of Winnie (approx.
The View of the Mayumi Legacy Marker along the street image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, January 11, 2023
2. The View of the Mayumi Legacy Marker along the street
10.4 miles away); Winnie-Stowell (approx. 10.6 miles away); City of Beaumont (approx. 12.7 miles away); The Lucas Gusher (approx. 13.6 miles away); Opelousas Trail (approx. 13.7 miles away); Site Of Spindle Top Hill Confederate Camp (approx. 14˝ miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Mayumi History. A Road in Texas - Hellmut Klicker (Submitted on January 12, 2023, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

2. Rice Culture. Texas State Historical Association
An important event in the development of the Texas Gulf Coast rice industry was the introduction of seed imported from Japan in 1904. Seed rice had previously come from Honduras or the Carolinas. At the invitation of the Houston Chamber of Commerce and the Southern Pacific Railroad, Japanese farmers were brought to Texas to advise local farmers on rice production, bringing with them seed as a gift from the emperor of Japan. The first three years' harvest, which produced an average of thirty-four barrels an acre compared with an average of eighteen to twenty barrels from native rice seed, was sold as seed to Louisiana and Texas farmers. C. J. Knapp, founder of the United States agricultural agent system, helped to overcome government
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regulation to bring seed rice into the country. Japanese rice production began at Webster in Harris County under the direction of Seito Saibara, his family, and thirty original colonists. The Saibara family has been credited with establishing the Gulf Coast rice industry.
(Submitted on January 12, 2023, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 12, 2023. It was originally submitted on January 12, 2023, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 228 times since then and 87 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 12, 2023, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Jun. 22, 2024