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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Occoquan in Prince William County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Occoquan River Bridges

 
 
Occoquan River Bridges Marker (Obverse) image. Click for full size.
By Kevin White, September 6, 2007
1. Occoquan River Bridges Marker (Obverse)
Inscription.  Occoquan founder Nathaniel Ellicott built the first bridge here c. 1800. The “Great Mail Route” from Washington to the south crossed here. In 1878 an iron Pratt Truss Bridge was erected. This bridge was on the main east coast north-south highway until 1928. Hurricane Agnes destroyed the bridge in 1972. Today’s foot bridge replaced it.
 
Erected by Town of Occoquan.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Bridges & ViaductsColonial EraRoads & VehiclesWaterways & Vessels. In addition, it is included in the Virginia, Historic Occoquan series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1800.
 
Location. 38° 41.149′ N, 77° 15.761′ W. Marker is in Occoquan, Virginia, in Prince William County. Marker is on Mill Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Occoquan VA 22125, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Historic Occoquan (a few steps from this marker); The Dogue Indians (a few steps from this marker); Town of Occoquan (within shouting distance
Occoquan River Bridges Marker (Reverse) image. Click for full size.
By Kevin White, September 6, 2007
2. Occoquan River Bridges Marker (Reverse)
1950 Photo, Source Unknown
Click or scan to see
this page online
of this marker); a different marker also named Historic Occoquan (within shouting distance of this marker); Gearwheel Assembly (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Historic Occoquan (within shouting distance of this marker); Occoquan (within shouting distance of this marker); Ellicott’s Mill (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Occoquan.
 
More about this marker. Marker is located at the end of Mill Street, along a footpath leading to the footbridge.
 
Regarding Occoquan River Bridges. Pictures of the Iron Pratt Truss Bridge being destroyed by Hurricane Agnes are available for viewing in the Mill House Museum.

A Town Gala is scheduled for October 14, 2007 to accompany a formal dedication of the newest bridge, and to coincide with the Virginia 2007 theme for the month of October, “Local History Month.”
 
Also see . . .  Historic Occoquan Self Guided Walking Tour. (Submitted on September 21, 2019.)
 
Occoquan River Bridges Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin White, September 6, 2007
3. Occoquan River Bridges Marker
Occoquan River Bridges Marker (Text side). image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, June 4, 2019
4. Occoquan River Bridges Marker (Text side).
Viewing east towards marker.
Note: Marker is facing a different direction that earlier images and a metal light post is now next to it.
The Current Foot Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Kevin White, September 6, 2007
5. The Current Foot Bridge
Occoquan River image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, June 4, 2019
6. Occoquan River
Viewing east from the footbridge at the river.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 26, 2019. It was originally submitted on September 9, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,765 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 9, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   4. submitted on September 21, 2019.   5. submitted on September 9, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   6. submitted on September 21, 2019. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 23, 2021